Dutch pewter marks

Dutch pewter marks


  • Pewter Pitchers
  • Pennsylvania Pewter
  • Vintage Dutch Pewter Chamberstick
  • Pewter: Is It Worth Anything?
  • Pewter Touchmarks
  • Pewter Pitchers

    Nevertheless, the experienced collector will know by certain design features, details of workmanship, and characteristics of the alloy that some pieces are, or are not, American. The new collector, however, must depend upon pewter marks to help determine the nationality of a piece of pewter.

    The following is an introduction to the types of marks that may be found on American pewter. Marked examples have been found by only about three hundred American pewterers. Pewterer's Marks Pewterers' marks fall into five broad categories: touch marks, hallmarks, quality marks, labels and catalogue numbers. Below is an example of the marks of a pewterer who used three of these types of marks touch mark, hallmark, and a label or place mark. Note that Nathaniel Austin's working period was from to and that he used both a pre-Revolutionary, "Lion-in-Gataeway", touchmark and a post-Revolutionary, "Eagle", touchmark.

    However the last volume was published in Other sources for drawings of most of the American pewter marks are listed in the bibliography. Touch Marks A touch mark is a pewterer's "trade mark" and in American pewter almost always includes the name or initials of the pewterer.

    Unlike in London and Edinburgh where guilds regulated the trade, there were no American touch plates where the touch marks of pewterers were recorded. Touch marks vary in both size and style but there are some regional characteristics.

    And as shown in the touch marks of Nathaniel Austin above, touch marks used prior to the American Revolution tend to show English influence, while those used afterwards often include the American Eagle.

    After about the originality of the decorative touches declined radically to simply the pewterer's name in a line form, with some in a rectangular frame. Boardman Hartford, CT, - 70 Samuel Kilbourn Baltimore, MD, - 39 Leonard, Reed and Barton Taunton, MA, - 40 Hallmarks Sometimes called pseudo-hallmarks because they resemble the hallmarks found on silver, these marks often were used with the larger touchmarks or in place of them.

    For the few 17th century American pewterers that have been identified, hallmarks are the only marks that have been found. When used in this country it was most often incorporated into the pewterer's touch mark along with his name.

    The crowned "X" mark was also used by some American pewterers to "imply" quality. None of these quality marks had any regulatory standing or enforcement. William Will Philadelphia, PA, - 98 Labels and Cartouches Some scroll-like labels called cartouches contain the pewterer's name, however most labels found on American pewter are place names, i.

    A few marked their pewter with a "London" mark to either deceive their customers or at least imply that their pewter was up to London standards, considered the highest. Only two, Samuel Hamlin, Sr. They are normally simple stamped numbers of three, four or five digits, sometimes with a letter as well.

    They are most common on wares made of Britannia metal. Verification Marks Verification marks on American pewter are rare because American made measures are rare with the exception of the 19th century measures made by the Boardmans of Hartford, CT.

    American verification marks, however, can be found on English export baluster measures. These marks are simply letters, indicating the state, commonwealth, or county in which they were inspected, verified and used. These letters most often were stamped on the lids of baluster measures or on the upper rim of the body. Unlike in England where verification marks can be found on pub or tavern mugs, such marks are extremely rare on American mugs.

    Ownership Marks Owners often had their initials applied by the pewterer, particularly on sadware. Often it will consist of two or three initials in a straight line; occasionally they will appear in a triad, the center, higher initial being the surname and the other two the forenames of the husband and wife.

    Some 18th century pewterers owned unique sets of crowned initial marks, distinctive enough to serve as a means of identifying the pewterer. Church pewter is often found engraved with the name of the church.

    Merchant's Marks Some merchants had marks that are as elaborate as touchmarks. There is some evidence that these marks were applied by the pewterer that made the piece. Examples of these merchants are believed to be: Blakeslee Barns, H. Rust, and Spencer Stafford, all at one time thought to be pewterers. The marks used from Collecting American Pewter were originally drawn for that book by Mr. Sheridan P. National Meetings Calendar.

    Pennsylvania Pewter

    In London and Edinburgh pewterers had to record their touch marks on special plates, and we know the names of most of those who did so. So whilst thousands of touch marks have been recorded, we do not always know the pewterers to whom they belong.

    Touch marks vary considerably in style and size, and by the 19th century they had often become just a simple name stamp. If a touch mark includes a date, this is the date on which the pewterer set up in business, not the date on which the article was made. Touch mark of William Millett Good early pewter often bears elaborate ownership marks in a raised form, rather like a wax seal. Triads a triangular formation of letters stamped on the rim of a pewter plate are generally held to give the initials of the couple who owned it.

    Small marks are also found on pewter in imitation of silver hallmarks, and usually consist of four shields 1. After , tankards and measures used in taverns had to carry capacity marks. Pseudo-hallmarks When brand new and highly polished, pewter looks very much like silver, and many pewterers stamped pseudo-hallmarks on their wares to mimic the officially-approved hallmarks on silver.

    It is more likely that the customers wanted the hallmarks so they their visitors would think they were wealthy enough to afford silver! Whilst hallmarks on pewter have no official significance, they can help identify the pewterer. There are normally four hallmarks, but pewterers from Wigan often used five, whilst very occasionally other pewterers used two, three or six.

    Sometimes all the hallmarks are the same. Hallmarks were not used prior to about With plates, dishes and chargers the position of the hallmarks can help with dating. They were normally on the front of the rim up to about , and thereafter on the back of the well. Dutch and American pewterers also used pseudo-hallmarks, so the presence of hallmarks is not conclusive evidence that the piece is British. Quality marks The crowned rose was used on pewter from the mid 16th century to denote higher-quality metal.

    Most pewterers had their own variation of the design. By the end of the 17th century pewterers were also using a crowned X to indicate harder alloys, but as time went on all control over the use of both marks was lost and pewterers used them indiscriminately on all their wares. Crowned rose marks can be helpful in identifying pewterers as most used their own variation of the design. Even crowned Xs can sometimes be helpful, although there is less scope for variation.

    See the Labels page for some examples. Before the introduction of the crowned rose, a crowned or uncrowned hammer was sometimes struck on sadware and this is also believed to be a quality mark. However, it is very rare. Labels A Label Mark In the 18th and 19th centuries many pewterers put various labels on their wares. Non-London pewterers used it because traditionally London pewter was considered to be superior.

    The presence of these marks does not mean the item was actually exported to the US as many makers took the easy route and simply stamped all their wares. Catalogue numbers In the 19th and 20th century pewterers often produced catalogues of their wares and put the catalogue numbers on the articles themselves.

    They are normally simple stamped numbers of three, four or five digits, sometimes with a letter as well. They are most common on wares made of Britannia metal. Teapots, coffee pots and jugs from Sheffield manufacturers are often stamped with a single digit representing the capacity. In the 19th and 20th centuries, workmen in some of the larger businesses stamped their own number or occasionally letter on the piece.

    Prior to you may find the diamond design registration mark rather than a registration number. Verification and capacity marks An example of a capacity mark. These marks only appear on drinking vessels and measures that are made to a specific capacity. Such marks became a legal requirement in The presence of such a mark does not mean the item is post as vessels made before then which remained in use after were often marked retrospectively.

    Equally, the absence of any capacity mark does not mean the vessel must be pre as not everyone adhered to the law. It became a country-wide legal requirement to stamp all measures with a verification mark in , though some areas such as the Cities of London and Westminster had being do so before this. Until about each town generally had its own style of mark. Measures were often inspected several times during their lifetime and thus can carry several verification marks.

    Sometimes at subsequent inspections the inspector merely stamped a two digit number signifying the year of re-inspection. Marks denoting the capacity standard In the Imperial Standard was introduced to supersede a number of other standards that had been in use until then.

    In practice a number of regions failed to switch to the new standard until several years later, and indeed non-Imperial standards were still occasionally being used in the late 19th century. The word Imperial on a measure shows it was made to the new standard and is therefore post Prior to the compulsory introduction of verification marks in , pewterers often punched their own mark to indicate the capacity standard to which the measure conformed.

    This mark probably continued in use until amending Acts came into force in and This mark continued in use until at least Very occasionally, a crowned AR or a crowned HR will be found on earlier measures. Ownership marks Owners often applied their own marks to pewter. On plates, dishes and chargers these were usually just a simple triad of initials stamped on the rim, the centre initial being the surname and the other two the forenames of the husband and wife.

    Marks with two or four initials are also found. However, some owners had crests or shields engraved on their pewter, whilst institutional owners might stamp their name or symbol. On drinking vessels owners tended to engrave either a monogram or the full name and address. These are particularly common on pub pots of the 19th and 20th century as a deterrence against theft.

    In the unlikely event that you come across pewter from the 15th or 16th century, you may find ownership marks of different forms. Indeed, in many countries or regions, no one has yet researched old pewter marks, which means identifying them is very difficult.

    However the United States and a number of European countries have been well researched and there are books that will help you identify marks from those areas.

    American pewterers American pewterers used touch marks, quality marks and, occasionally, hallmarks that are broadly similar to those used by British pewterers.

    The style of mark often identifies the town, and indeed often includes the emblem or arms of the town. Dates in such marks have nothing to do with the pewterer. They simply indicate the date of the relevant guild regulations, which in some instances may have been introduced years earlier. The following booklet does not itself contain marks but is a comprehensive list of all the principal source books for European marks, with analyses and comments.

    It can be purchased from the Society.

    Nevertheless, the experienced collector will know by certain design features, details of workmanship, and characteristics of the alloy that some pieces are, or are not, American. The new collector, however, must depend upon pewter marks to help determine the nationality of a piece of pewter. The following is an introduction to the types of marks that may be found on American pewter. Marked examples have been found by only about three hundred American pewterers.

    Pewterer's Marks Pewterers' marks fall into five broad categories: touch marks, hallmarks, quality marks, labels and catalogue numbers. Below is an example of the marks of a pewterer who used three of these types of marks touch mark, hallmark, and a label or place mark.

    Vintage Dutch Pewter Chamberstick

    Note that Nathaniel Austin's working period was from to and that he used both a pre-Revolutionary, "Lion-in-Gataeway", touchmark and a post-Revolutionary, "Eagle", touchmark. However the last volume was published in Other sources for drawings of most of the American pewter marks are listed in the bibliography.

    Touch Marks A touch mark is a pewterer's "trade mark" and in American pewter almost always includes the name or initials of the pewterer. Unlike in London and Edinburgh where guilds regulated the trade, there were no American touch plates where the touch marks of pewterers were recorded.

    Pewter: Is It Worth Anything?

    Touch marks vary in both size and style but there are some regional characteristics. And as shown in the touch marks of Nathaniel Austin above, touch marks used prior to the American Revolution tend to show English influence, while those used afterwards often include the American Eagle.

    After about the originality of the decorative touches declined radically to simply the pewterer's name in a line form, with some in a rectangular frame. Boardman Hartford, CT, - 70 Samuel Kilbourn Baltimore, MD, - 39 Leonard, Reed and Barton Taunton, MA, - 40 Hallmarks Sometimes called pseudo-hallmarks because they resemble the hallmarks found on silver, these marks often were used with the larger touchmarks or in place of them. For the few 17th century American pewterers that have been identified, hallmarks are the only marks that have been found.

    When used in this country it was most often incorporated into the pewterer's touch mark along with his name. The crowned "X" mark was also used by some American pewterers to "imply" quality.

    None of these quality marks had any regulatory standing or enforcement. William Will Philadelphia, PA, - 98 Labels and Cartouches Some scroll-like labels called cartouches contain the pewterer's name, however most labels found on American pewter are place names, i.

    This is a welcome change reminiscent of their s road jerseys. When the Royals reintroduced the powder blue jersey originally inthat featured a royal blue script outline in white with a white number. The team updated that jersey inthe colors were reversed. Another change is the outlining of the script and numbers.

    Pewter Touchmarks

    All outlining has been removed. The sleeve piping is now solid white and fits the template of the white and gray jerseys. Previously they had been white outlined in royal.

    This jersey has undergone the most change from the previous iteration. Like the other jerseys, the sleeve piping has been thickened. On the other hand, removing the superfluous powder outlining certainly makes everything pop enhances the contrast. An ode to the past. A nod to the future. On the other hand, making the road gray more staid and basically making the royal alternate a color swap of the gray was a minor downgrade. But what do you guys think of these?

    About the same? Hopefully this style will better translate on the actual on field jerseys. Reader Josh Levy was able to make it to the store and he also took a few photos. Thanks, Josh Levy And here are the shots Josh took: You can see a lot more photos from the opening here. The sign outside the store fell to the ground.


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