Homemade bud hardener

Homemade bud hardener


  • How to Grow Dense Buds Indoors?
  • How do you harvest buds without killing the plant?
  • Make cannabis buds harder and more dense with one simple operation
  • The Captain’s Nutrient Recipe
  • A Kailo Chic Life
  • How To Make Squishy KOALA – Homemade Squishy Tutorial
  • How to Grow Dense Buds Indoors?

    How did I find out that the biggest hydroponics companies are putting our health at risk? It started because I love popcorn. Not the buttery kind you get at movie theaters.

    Hardened, chunky, sticky, gooey marijuana nugs packed with THC! Serious marijuana growers like you and me want to push our cannabis plants to deliver dank, hard nugs packed with THC crystals that get you super-high.

    These products are alleged to make my blooming cannabis plants channel energy into flower production and bushiness, rather than height. I used to use those kinds of bud boosters. Tighter, harder, earlier-maturing buds, and shorter plants. But these bud-booster products also twisted my leaves, and often made my buds look, taste, and smell like alien ditchweed.

    So I said to the guy: Alright, then please get me Phosphoload bloom booster. They only talk about kelp, humic acids, amino acids, phosphorus, and potassium. He showed me marijuana grower forums on the Net where our marijuana community raised the alarm about dangerous PGR products, starting several years ago. I heard growers asking: Ok, so the government says these products are dangerous, and have told the hydroponics industry to stop selling the stuff, so why do Sunlight Supply, Hydrofarm, Monster Gardens, General Hydroponics, and many hydroponics stores still sell PGR-laden products?

    Bush Load can be readily absorbed by plant roots and translocated to the active growing points. Application of Bush Load produces a long lasting, uniform growth regulation. Yet, you can find Bush Load in a General Hydroponics product brochure. Contact GH for usage recommendations. The General Hydroponics lady told me someone would call me back. But nobody ever did. Are you absolutely sure of their safety?

    When will you disclose whether there is or is not PGR material, or other unsafe compounds, in your products? And read about a Southern California commercial-size medical marijuana grower whose crops failed suddenly and for no apparent reason.

    It was a cruel situation. The grower lost everything, including his marijuana plants and freedom, in a product liability court battle with Sunlight Supply that ended when the hydroponics company apparently got the feds involved…and the grower got busted for violating federal marijuana law!

    Just recently, hydroponics distributor Hydrofarm agreed to pay the U. The Environmental Protection Agency, acting on a tip from a hydroponics store investigation, found that neither product was properly labeled to protect users. In fact, regulators said Nutralife Plant Products H contains so much concentrated hydrogen peroxide that it could cause skin burns and severe eye injuries. If inhaled, it could be fatal! Because when you get right down to it, they lost my trust, and my grow shop dollars, when they endangered my marijuana and my health!

    How do you harvest buds without killing the plant?

    When a magnetic field changes near a metal or other conductive object, a flow of current known as an eddy current will be induced in the material and will generate heat. The heat generated is proportional to the current squared multiplied by the resistance of the material.

    The effects of induction are used in transformers for converting voltages in all sorts of appliances. Most transformers have a metallic core and will therefore have eddy currents induced into them when in use. Transformer designers use different techniques to prevent this as the heating is just wasted energy.

    In this project we will directly make use of this heating effect and try to maximise the heating effect produced by the eddy currents. If we apply a continuously changing current to a coil of wire, we will have a continuously changing magnetic field within it. At higher frequencies the induction effect is quite strong and will tend to concentrate on the surface of the material being heated due to the skin effect.

    Typical induction heaters use frequencies from 10kHz to 1MHz. The Circuit The circuit used is a type of collector resonance Royer oscillator which has the advantages of simplicity and self resonant operation. A very similar circuit is used in common inverter circuits used for powering fluorescent lighting such as LCD backlights. They drive a centre tapped transformer which steps up the voltage to around V for powering the lights.

    In this DIY induction heater circuit the transformer consists of the work coil and the object to be heated. The main disadvantage of this circuit is that a centre tapped coil is needed which can be a little more tricky to wind than a common solenoid. The centre tapped coil is needed so that we can create an AC field from a single DC supply and just two N-type transistors.

    The centre of the coil is connected to the positive supply and then each end of the coil is alternately connected to ground by the transistors so that the current will flow back and forth in both directions. The amount of current drawn from the supply will vary with the temperature and size of the object being heated. From this schematic of the induction heater you can see how simple it really is. Just a few basic components are all that is needed for creating a working induction heater device.

    R1 and R2 are standard ohm, 0. The value of these resistors will determine how quickly the MOSFETs can turn on, and should be a reasonably low value. They should not be too small though, as the resistor will be pulled to ground via the diode when the opposite transistor switches on.

    They should be diodes with a low forward voltage drop so that the gate will be well discharged and the MOSFET fully off when the other is on. Schottky diodes such as the 1N are recommended as they have low voltage drop and high speed.

    The voltage rating of the diodes must be sufficient to withstand the the voltage rise in the resonant circuit. In this project the voltage rose to as much as 70V. They were mounted on heatsinks for this project, but they barely got warm when running at the power levels shown here. The inductor L2 is used as a choke for keeping the high frequency oscillations out of the power supply, and to limit current to acceptable levels.

    The value of inductance should be quite large ours was about 2mH , but also must be made with thick enough wire for carrying all the supply current. If there is no choke used, or it has too little inductance, the circuit might fail to oscillate. The exact inductance value needed will vary with the PSU used and your coil setup.

    You may need to experiment before you get a good result. The one shown here was made by winding about 8 turns of 2mm thick magnet wire on a toroidal ferrite core. As an alternative you can simply wind wire onto a large bolt but you will need many more turns of wire to get the same inductance as from a toroidal ferrite core. You can see an example of this in the photo on the left. In the bottom left corner you can see a bolt wrapped with many turns of equipment wire.

    This setup on the breadboard was used at low power for testing. For more power it was necessary to use thicker wiring and to solder everything together. As there were so few components involved, we soldered all the connections directly and did not use a PCB.

    This was also useful for making the connections for the high current parts as thick wire could be directly soldered to the transistor terminals. In hindsight it might have been better to connect the induction coil by screwing it directly to the heatsinks on the MOSFETs. This is because the metal body of the transistors is also the collector terminal, and the heatsinks could help keep the coil cooler.

    The capacitor C1 and inductor L1 form the resonant tank circuit of the induction heater. These must be able to withstand large currents and temperatures. We used some nF polypropylene capacitors. More detail on these components is shown below. The Induction Coil and Capacitor The coil must be made of thick wire or pipe as there will be large currents flowing in it.

    Copper pipe works well as the high frequency currents will mostly flow on the outer parts anyway. You can also pump cold water through the pipe to keep it cool. A capacitor must be connected parallel to the work coil to create a resonant tank circuit.

    The combination of inductance and capacitance will have a specific resonant frequency at which the control circuit will automatically operate. The coil-capacitor combination used here resonated at around kHz. It is important to use good quality capacitors that can withstand large currents and the heat dissipated within them otherwise they would soon fail and destroy your drive circuit.

    They must also be placed reasonably close to the work coil and using thick wire or pipe. Most of the current will be flowing between the coil and capacitor so this wire must be thickest. The wires linking to the circuit and power supply can be slightly thinner if desired. This coil here was made from 2mm diameter brass pipe. It was simple to wind and easy to solder to, but it would soon start to deform due to excess heating.

    The turns would then touch, shorting out and making it less effective. Since the control circuit stayed relatively cool during use, it seemed that this could be made to work at higher power levels but it would be necessary to use thicker pipe or to water cool it. Next the setup was improved to tolerate a higher power level… Wide range of parts available for induction heaters.

    Make cannabis buds harder and more dense with one simple operation

    From this schematic of the induction heater you can see how simple it really is. Just a few basic components are all that is needed for creating a working induction heater device. R1 and R2 are standard ohm, 0. The value of these resistors will determine how quickly the MOSFETs can turn on, and should be a reasonably low value.

    They should not be too small though, as the resistor will be pulled to ground via the diode when the opposite transistor switches on. They should be diodes with a low forward voltage drop so that the gate will be well discharged and the MOSFET fully off when the other is on.

    Schottky diodes such as the 1N are recommended as they have low voltage drop and high speed. The voltage rating of the diodes must be sufficient to withstand the the voltage rise in the resonant circuit.

    The Captain’s Nutrient Recipe

    In this project the voltage rose to as much as 70V. They were mounted on heatsinks for this project, but they barely got warm when running at the power levels shown here. The inductor L2 is used as a choke for keeping the high frequency oscillations out of the power supply, and to limit current to acceptable levels.

    The value of inductance should be quite large ours was about 2mHbut also must be made with thick enough wire for carrying all the supply current. If there is no choke used, or it has too little inductance, the circuit might fail to oscillate. The exact inductance value needed will vary with the PSU used and your coil setup. You may need to experiment before you get a good result. The one shown here was made by winding about 8 turns of 2mm thick magnet wire on a toroidal ferrite core.

    As an alternative you can simply wind wire onto a large bolt but you will need many more turns of wire to get the same inductance as from a toroidal ferrite core. You can see an example of this in the photo on the left. In the bottom left corner you can see a bolt wrapped with many turns of equipment wire. This setup on the breadboard was used at low power for testing.

    For more power it was necessary to use thicker wiring and to solder everything together. As there were so few components involved, we soldered all the connections directly and did not use a PCB. This was also useful for making the connections for the high current parts as thick wire could be directly soldered to the transistor terminals. In hindsight it might have been better to connect the induction coil by screwing it directly to the heatsinks on the MOSFETs. This is because the metal body of the transistors is also the collector terminal, and the heatsinks could help keep the coil cooler.

    The capacitor C1 and inductor L1 form the resonant tank circuit of the induction heater. These must be able to withstand large currents and temperatures. We used some nF polypropylene capacitors. More detail on these components is shown below. The Induction Coil and Capacitor The coil must be made of thick wire or pipe as there will be large currents flowing in it.

    To answer your question, yes, you can cut the ripe buds off the top of the plant and remove the branches and leaves for better light transmission at the bottom of the plant.

    And the lower buds will continue to grow and mature and can be harvested a week or two later. How do you harvest buds without killing the plant? In the first weeks a female cannabis flower or bud is formed, it will have long white hairs coming out if it.

    After 4 to 5 weeks the simple slavery se will start to turn yellowish. What happens if you wait too long to harvest? Harvest timing is arguably the trickiest aspect of growing marijuana for newbies. If you do it too early, you reduce the overall potency of your cannabis. If you leave it too late, your weed will have an excessively strong taste and an unwanted narcotic effect.

    Should you remove fan leaves during flowering? Yes you should — but with the correct technique. Removing these fan leaves opens up light and produces better air exchange to the lower canopy. When should I stop watering before harvesting? Stop Watering Days Before Harvest — After flushing, in the final days of harvest, you can further stress your plants by stopping watering.

    What do trichomes look like when ready to harvest? Trichomes are small crystalline mushroom-shaped bumps covering the buds.

    A Kailo Chic Life

    Is it OK to trim leaves during flowering? During flowering time, it is still possible to trim off lower branches, but you must be conservative and not cut off too much. Trimming any plant does cause some amount of stress, and overdoing it can send a plant into shock, sending all its resources to heal the areas you have cut off.

    Should I trim my plant before harvest? When is the best time to trim your cannabis? Trimming at home begins a few weeks before harvest when the larger leaves are removed. Usually, growers trim the fan leaves weeks before harvest, which is a period that leads to senescence, a phase in the plant cycle when the larger leaves start fading away.

    Is it bad to harvest bud early? Some bud is better than no bud at all! How do I sample my buds? Do make sure that your buds are evenly spaced apart.

    How To Make Squishy KOALA – Homemade Squishy Tutorial

    Set your oven or microwave to degrees Fahrenheit. Pop in your baking tray and leave them inside for 8 to 10 minutes. Pull them out, turn them over, and leave them in for another 5 minutes. What Week Do buds fatten up the most? Weeks Buds Fatten Up At this stage of cannabis flowering, your buds are getting bigger.

    Do buds get bigger last 2 weeks? In the last two weeks, the buds will mostly be ripening and not really growing much more in size.

    At this point, the previously white pistils on the buds will now slowly turn amber-brown.


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