How to edit synoinfo conf

How to edit synoinfo conf


  • How to install Docker on an unsupported Synology NAS (updated 2020)
  • Xpenology Experiment – Norco RPC-3216 Case
  • Upgrade synology DS409 to DSM6
  • Synology: Text Editor is a Must Have
  • Synology DSM 5 web station and virtual sites for FileStation
  • Fix Xpenology problems viewing internal hard drives as esata hard drives
  • How to install Docker on an unsupported Synology NAS (updated 2020)

    See migration notes below to find out how to transfer to CrashPlan for Small Business on Synology at the special discounted rate. CrashPlan is a popular online backup solution which supports continuous syncing. With this your NAS can become even more resilient, particularly against the threat of ransomware. Reporting via Admin Console. Cloud backup subscription typically billed by storage usage, also available from third parties.

    The instructions and notes on this page apply to both versions of the Synology package. Way back in January I decided to simplify it into a Synology package, since I had already created several others. It has been through many versions since that time, as the changelog below shows. I then had to write my own script to extract this archive and mimic the Code 42 installer behaviour, but without the interactive prompts of the original.

    Set the Trust Level to Synology Inc. DSM 5. It is recommended that you select to have the package install a dedicated Java 8 runtime.

    The package expects to find this. If you go ahead and try to install the package without it, the error message will indicate precisely which Java file you need for your system type, and it will provide a TinyURL link to the appropriate Oracle download page. If you have a multi-bay NAS, use the Shared Folder control panel to create the shared folder called public it must be all lower case. On single bay models this is created by default. CrashPlan is installed in headless mode — backup engine only.

    This will configured by a desktop client, but operates independently of it. The first time you start the CrashPlan package you will need to stop it and restart it before you can connect the client.

    This is because a config file that is only created on first run needs to be edited by one of my scripts. The engine is then configured to listen on all interfaces on the default port Make sure that you install the version of the CrashPlan client that matches the version running on the NAS. If the NAS version gets upgraded later, you will need to update your client computer too. By default the client is configured to connect to the CrashPlan engine running on the local computer. This will give you a port number , followed by an authentication token, followed by the IP binding 0.

    You should disable the CrashPlan service on your computer if you intend only to use the client. In the service Properties set the Startup Type to Manual.

    This seems to trigger the CrashPlan client to begin an update to 4. The web page is likely to stall on the Migrating step, but no matter. The process is meant to take you to the store but it seems to be quite flakey. Enter your credit card details and check out if you can. If not, continue. Ignore the red message in the bottom left of the Admin Console about registering, and do not sign up for the free trial.

    Preferably use Firefox for the Linux version download — most of the other web browsers will try to unpack the. The package will no longer download this automatically as it did in previous versions.

    This will stop the CrashPlan package and automatically import its configuration. Notice that it will also backup your old CrashPlan.

    You should see your protected folders as usual. Uninstall the CrashPlan 4. While signed in, navigate to this link which I was given by Code 42 support. I had to do this a few times before it worked. Once the store referral link worked and I had confirmed my payment details my CrashPlan PRO client immediately started working.

    I am complying with the directive that no one redistributes it. The engine daemon script checks the amount of system RAM and scales the Java heap size appropriately up to the default maximum of MB.

    Memory is very limited on the cheaper models. I have found that a MB heap was insufficient to back up more than 2TB of files on a Windows server and that was the situation many years ago. It kept restarting the backup engine every few minutes until I increased the heap to MB. Many users of the package have found that they have to increase the heap size or CrashPlan will halt its activity.

    This can be mitigated by dividing your backup into several smaller backup sets which are scheduled to be protected at different times. If you need to manage CrashPlan from a remote location, I suggest you do so using SSH tunnelling as per this support document. The package supports upgrading to future versions while preserving the machine identity, logs, login details, and cache. Upgrades can now take place without requiring a login from the client afterwards. If you remove the package completely and re-install it later, you can re-attach to previous backups.

    This is typically caused by syntax differences with the Synology versions of certain Linux shell commands like rm, mv, or ps. The startup script will attempt to apply the published upgrade the next time the package is started. You can get more information about how packages work by reading the Synology 3rd Party Developer Guide. The Java binary could not be located. Please update your Java package. Please read the Migration section on this page for instructions.

    Xpenology Experiment – Norco RPC-3216 Case

    Start a tech project! This was not going to be easy and I could only spend short periods of time working on the project. I had been saving data to these drives and storing them in a closet as cold storage. I kept a log of data and the corresponding drives, but this was not efficient and I ended up with different versions or duplicate data.

    I needed a better solution. I had an old computer not being used and it had decent components. I thought I would build a storage server, but the computer case could only hold eight hard drives. I wanted to use all of my hard drives in a single system, so an eight bay case would not work for this project.

    I bought it on Amazon because I had a lot of reward points. If not for this, I would have likely purchased a Supermicro from ebay.

    Many of these come with everything except the hard drives, though the components are often energy hogs. Electricity is expensive where I live, so this would be an issue. I knew this Norco case would have shortfalls because it cost far less than any other sixteen bay hot swap case and the reviews averaged on okay.

    Because of the price, I was willing to accept some issues. Pros: Low price. Cheaper than almost anything new and with comparable features. Decent amount of room. More on that in cons. This photo is the test installation and I have not bundled wires or installed SAS cards. I will likely be removing everything because of the PCI slot covers on the case. It will be heavy when I load sixteen WD Red drives. I bought a rack shelf that can hold pounds instead of rails. I almost went with 4U for the extra room, but I really prefer 3U.

    Description and photos on Amazon and Norco website are wrong. This case comes with three mm fans and not four 80mm but they are garbage — more on that in cons. That was changed by the manufacturer and the model number remained the same. The mm fans slide in and out as seen in the orange brackets.

    These slide into a mounting bracket that supplies the power. Handy since the ones included were garbage it needed to be said again. The 60mm fans are not nearly as loud as I expected and they actually work. I hate pulling things out of a rack for something like a dead fan! Maybe I should be preemptive. The OS is installed on the actual drives. A slim optical drive can be installed, if anyone will ever need such a thing.

    I almost painted the body of the case black since I have an open rack. I expected sharp edges since this case was so inexpensive, but it was not bad. Cons: The mm fans are garbage. Another fan was very weak and barely moved any air. Please note that these fans have 4 pin connectors and replacement fans should be the same so they can fit in the trays that hold the fans see photo.

    You could go with any mm fan and not use the fan enclosures that allow them to be easily removed and reinserted. If you do that, you will want some type of grill to keep wires out — and you will need that because space in that area is cramped! Space is tight between the backplane and the fans. Routing the SAS cables is going to be a challenge.

    I waited to order these to see what I would be dealing with. I was going to order angled cables due to the lack of room, but I went with regular cables that were flat and likely easily bendable. I have a little room behind the PSU rats nest of cables for more. One person mentioned removing a fan to route the cables. I considered removing the fan in front of the PSU, but I like a case to be as cool as possible.

    The bracket that holds the fans should have been adjustable forward and back. I have a decent amount of room between the fans and the motherboard. It would have only required the manufacturer to drill extra holes. This would have also made it easier to plug in the molex power cables.

    Back to the space between the fans and the backplane. The backplane requires 4 pin molex power and it can be difficult to route power to them. There is a notch between the fan bracket and the side of the case, but it is very narrow. My PSU cables barely made it through that notch and were not long enough to get to all four molex power on the backplane.

    I ended up using long molex extension cables [like this] to run to the backplane. This made it much easier, but it was still difficult to plug them in.

    I wish the backplane used SATA power, which would have been much easier to plug in! You will also want a fifth molex extension cable because the fans connect to a bracket that provides power to the fans. This bracket uses a molex connector that is crammed in a really tight spot. Plug in this molex power first because the other cables will get in the way.

    Not really a fault of the case since it is 3U, but you should get a modular PSU if buying one for the build. This will also block some airflow. Please note that this case uses a standard computer power supply and not a redundant server PSU. It looks like a PCI riser card with a ribbon cable can fit. That means the USB 2 and 3 ports on the motherboard must be close together or you will need some type of extension cable unless this cable provides either USB 2 or 3 to both ports depending on what you have plugged in to the motherboard.

    They welded on a couple spots and it requires wiggling or prying them until the welds break. I did not know this before mounting my motherboard. I now need to remove the motherboard or very carefully try and remove the PCI covers.

    Cheap materials, but decent build. Nothing was obviously broken or bent. What do you expect since this costs a heck of a lot less than anything else with comparable features? The HDD trays do not slide smoothly. I pulled out a couple and they are stiff.

    I will not be removing hard drives unless they fail. There was no manual of any kind included. This was not too important since everything is fairly straightforward. There were a lot of cons compared to the pros, but the cost made up for me so far. If I were building something for a more important purpose and buying new components, I would not have purchased this case.

    In that scenario, I would have looked at Supermicro. However, this is not going to be for a mission critical purpose. I am building something to use for on-site backup.

    As far as my components, you can see from the photos that I am using an older Gigabyte motherboard. We had a few of these at work as legacy machines and they are great boards! I have a Corsair watt PSU, which should be adequate as long as the drive spin-up does not fry it. Here are some more photographs, since I wanted to see more when researching this case.

    I am awaiting parts to be delivered. Once I receive these items, I will be able to complete the build and add to this post. I had to temporarily remove the center fan in order to plug in the SAS cables and then run them around the fan bracket. The flat cables were easy to run between the fan bracket and the side of the case, which is quite narrow, but round cables would have been fine and likely a better choice. If I were to do it over again, I would have likely chosen right angle, round cables that were a bit shorter.

    This was mainly because the edges of the flat cables would bend and tweak a bit when routing them and I was worried it could be an issue if I was not careful.

    I also had a few inches slack and it would be easy to loop round cables. However, they are staying if they work. I also installed the Noctua fans, which have cables longer than the fans that came with the case. That meant there was slack cable protruding out of the fan trays, but I just pushed them to the side. These fans push a good amount of air. I finally got around to installing the sixteen hard drives, and as others mentioned in reviews of this chassis, the hard drive trays feel cheap and some did not insert smoothly.

    Upgrade synology DS409 to DSM6

    This will configured by a desktop client, but operates independently of it. The first time you start the CrashPlan package you will need to stop it and restart it before you can connect the client. This is because a config file that is only created on first run needs to be edited by one of my scripts. The engine is then configured to listen on all interfaces on the default port Make sure that you install the version of the CrashPlan client that matches the version running on the NAS.

    If the NAS version gets upgraded later, you will need to update your client computer too. By default the client is configured to connect to the CrashPlan engine running on the local computer.

    This will give you a port numberfollowed by an authentication token, followed by the IP binding 0. You should disable the CrashPlan service on your computer if you intend only to use the client. In the service Properties set the Startup Type to Manual. This seems to trigger the CrashPlan client to begin an update to 4. The web page is likely to stall on the Migrating step, but no matter.

    The process is meant to take you to the store but it seems to be quite flakey. Enter your credit card details and check out if you can. If not, continue. Ignore the red message in the bottom left of the Admin Console about registering, and do not sign up for the free trial. Preferably use Firefox for the Linux version download — most of the other web browsers will try to unpack the.

    Synology: Text Editor is a Must Have

    The package will no longer download this automatically as it did in previous versions. This will stop the CrashPlan package and automatically import its configuration. Personally, as soon as the "music video's" are downloaded, I extract the sound tracks and keep only those. There are many software to do this. But one of my favorite option is to use ffmpeg directly on the Synology you have to install that package.

    The extension " Copy Selected Links ". Using that one, you can copy the URL's of all the playlists of a Channel, at once. Next, right-click in an empty area and select the menu "Copy selected Links". Select "Regular Expression" at the bottom of that window and click the "Replace All" button once you have entered this into the field "Find What":.

    Otherwise, you have to save with all your URL's into a. The extension " Download Station " or this version in Chrome Web Store to more easily download the playlists. This will help you when you search for a particular type of music for your video. There is also a limit of links per "file" uploaded and a limit for a playlist of " - amount of current download tasks".

    Don't forget that for most "No Copyright Music's", you have to mention the author in your video's or posts. Please note that this case uses a standard computer power supply and not a redundant server PSU. It looks like a PCI riser card with a ribbon cable can fit. That means the USB 2 and 3 ports on the motherboard must be close together or you will need some type of extension cable unless this cable provides either USB 2 or 3 to both ports depending on what you have plugged in to the motherboard.

    They welded on a couple spots and it requires wiggling or prying them until the welds break. I did not know this before mounting my motherboard. I now need to remove the motherboard or very carefully try and remove the PCI covers. Cheap materials, but decent build. Nothing was obviously broken or bent.

    What do you expect since this costs a heck of a lot less than anything else with comparable features? The HDD trays do not slide smoothly. I pulled out a couple and they are stiff. I will not be removing hard drives unless they fail.

    There was no manual of any kind included. This was not too important since everything is fairly straightforward. There were a lot of cons compared to the pros, but the cost made up for me so far. If I were building something for a more important purpose and buying new components, I would not have purchased this case.

    In that scenario, I would have looked at Supermicro. However, this is not going to be for a mission critical purpose. I am building something to use for on-site backup. As far as my components, you can see from the photos that I am polyphia kemper an older Gigabyte motherboard. We had a few of these at work as legacy machines and they are great boards!

    I have a Corsair watt PSU, which should be adequate as long as the drive spin-up does not fry it. Here are some more photographs, since I wanted to see more when researching this case. I am awaiting parts to be delivered. Once I receive these items, I will be able to complete the build and add to this post.

    Synology DSM 5 web station and virtual sites for FileStation

    I had to temporarily remove the center fan in order to plug in the SAS cables and then run them around the fan bracket. The flat cables were easy to run between the fan bracket and the side of the case, which is quite narrow, but round cables would have been fine and likely a better choice. If I were to do it over again, I would have likely chosen right angle, round cables that were a bit shorter.

    This was mainly because the edges of the flat cables would bend and tweak a bit when routing them and I was worried it could be an issue if I was not careful. I also had a few inches slack and it would be easy to loop round cables.

    Fix Xpenology problems viewing internal hard drives as esata hard drives

    However, they are staying if they work. I also installed the Noctua fans, which have cables longer than the fans that came with the case. That meant there was slack cable protruding out of the fan trays, but I just pushed them to the side. These fans push a good amount of air. I finally got around to installing the sixteen hard drives, and as others mentioned in reviews of this chassis, the hard drive trays feel cheap and some did not insert smoothly.

    Some of the trays took some work to get properly inserted. Since there was no information about the backplane, I guessed it was ordered from left to right, top to bottom. However, Xpenology mixes up the drives in the OS, so be sure to document the serial number of each drive and which bay it is in. Xpenology was initially troublesome so I tried Windows 10 and Storage Spaces. I built a parity volume with sixteen hard drives that ended up being about 37TB with one hard drive fault tolerance.

    There was no option for two drive fault tolerance in Windows I also went with DSM version 6. I figured I would play it safe for now.


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