How to clean muffler on stihl weedeater

How to clean muffler on stihl weedeater


  • Stihl Weed Eater Dies At Full Throttle – SOLVED
  • 8 Reasons Why Your Weed Eater Wont Start (2021)
  • Why is My Weed Eater Overheating? 6 Causes and 4 Solutions
  • Weed Eater Dies When Giving Gas? Quick Steps To Troubleshoot
  • What Causes A Weed Eater To Smoke: (5 Reasons)
  • Stihl Weed Eater Dies At Full Throttle – SOLVED

    Electrical or battery malfunctions 1 Gasoline Related Problems This is the major problem that could cause a weed eater to malfunction. The gas is old. Oxygen can break down unstabilized ethanol-containing gas in under a month. Using the incorrect ratio of gas and oil. Solution The above-listed issues are easily resolved. Use oil designed for 2 cycle engines, not regular motor oil. Do not mix the oil and gas in the gas tank, mix in a container beforehand to get a comprehensive blending.

    If you use the wrong ratio, it can cause your engine to seize, sputter, or overheat. Always try to shake the fuel in the tank before every use of your weed eater. This mixture of fuel and oxygen produces the initial spark and the power to get your engine running.

    Solution Find the black air filter box usually located at the back of the weed eater. Unscrew the air filter box and pull it off. Unscrew that and expose the air filter which is made of re-useable cell foam. Brush off any visible debris on the air filter. Wash the filter with mild detergent and warm water, gasoline, or acetone. Replace the box into the motor and then re-screw it back in.

    Change or clean your air filter at the beginning of every season. Solution Remove the spark plug cover and take out the spark plug.

    Clean the surrounding area of the spark plug. Look at the spark plug to see if there are any cracks, if there are then it needs to be replaced with a new one which is usually pretty inexpensive. Check to make sure the gap between the plug nodules is around. You can check the ignition coil with an ignition system tester, a cheap device that you can buy at the hardware store.

    Follow the following steps: Insert the spark plug wire lead into the spark test. Attach the alligator clip to the metal end at the tip of the spark plug.

    Turn the ignition switch on Pull the starter plug and check the window in the spark tester If the spark is strong and blue then the ignition coil is fine. If there is little to no spark then the ignition coil needs to be replaced. Go ahead and watch this youtube video that shows you how to replace an ignition coil. The problems that can occur with the carburetor include: Clogged or dirty fuel filter.

    The carburetor has a fuel filter that might get clogged and full of debris over time. Some signs of this include sputtering of the engine, engine misfires, or strong odors. Broken Priming Bulb.

    A priming bulb sends gas into the carburetor so it can create a fuel and air mixture that can go right into the cylinder to the engine running. Worn out carburetor. Clogged or Dirty Fuel filter.

    To clean out a fuel filter: Remove the fuel filter and clean with the carburetor or solvent cleaner. Wait for a few minutes to allow it to dissolve the debris.

    These are generally inexpensive and easy to get. Consider cleaning other parts of the carburetor with a solvent cleaner for a more thorough cleaning. Solution Take out the spark arrestor you can refer to the manual to find where it is and remove all screws blocking access to it.

    Hold it with a small plier then use a butane torch to burn off all carbon on it. Let it cool. If there is still some residue on it, then you can clean it off with a non-metallic brush. Refix the spark arrestor screen. Do not use a wire brush to clean as this can lead to faster plugging of dirt. Clean it monthly or after long storage. Pull the coil several times to remove the fuel.

    You will have to do this several times but continue until all the black smoke leaves the weed eater. Let it rest for about 20 minutes before trying to turn it on again. Solution Make sure that the electrical outlet is drawing power. Make sure all the cords are plugged in, on one side to the weed eater and on the other to the electrical outlet.

    Tips Try not to overcharge the batteries as this reduces their lifespan. Be careful not to drop the batteries because this damages them. Conclusion If you weed eater wont start, above are the most 8 common causes, A weed eater can last between years with correct usage and maintenance. To make sure your weed eater lasts that long. You should: Store the weed eater safely.

    Use Ethanol-free fuel. Invest in a better stroke oil. Make sure you mix the gas and oil properly. Regularly maintain the weed eater by cleaning or changing the spark plug, air filter, fuel filter, and spark arrestor screen.

    Cody Cody is a fulltime blogger and gardener. His favorite activity to relax after a long day of writing is taking care of his plants and garden. For the past few years he have spent more time in the garden than inside so if there is one man you should take advice from its our dear Cody.

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    8 Reasons Why Your Weed Eater Wont Start (2021)

    Summary Operating a String Trimmer When you turn on your trimmer, you may find that it stays idling perfectly well without any issues.

    However, when it comes to giving it some gas, the weed eater bogs down. More often than not, this is usually a problem relating to a lack of fuel or air; or both, reaching the engine. The good news is that by following the path of the fuel, you will likely run into the issue and be able to solve it at home. Stihl String Trimmer Troubleshooting; Dies At Full Throttle While you may feel disheartened when you encounter Stihl weed eater problems, there are some important things to check before declaring that your weed wacker has had it!

    Restoring Air Circulation If your Stihl trimmer stalls at full throttle, this could be related to the air circulation. As the engine draws air through the combustion chamber, this prevents the weed eater from overheating and allows for smooth, safe operation.

    However, there are many instances where this airflow could become interrupted and this would result in the trimmer stalling. Most commonly, this is because the air filter is dirty or blocked with debris, preventing air from moving through it.

    When this happens, your trimmer will splutter and eventually cut out altogether. This is something you can do at home. However, if you try this and still encounter problems, it could be that the airflow has been interrupted elsewhere in the system. Check Gas Cap And Fuel Filter One of the first things you should do when trying to diagnose a problem with your weed eater is to look at the fuel circulation.

    You will find this on the gas cap and it is present on almost all weed eaters. This air inlet is designed to stop a vacuum forming as the fuel moves into the carburetor, when it is blocked, this is no longer possible. Locate the gas cap and unscrew it slightly at the same time as running the trimmer. In addition to this, the Stihl weed wacker fuel filter could be causing a problem.

    This filter can get blocked in the same way as the air filter and gas cap and while it is difficult to tell just by looking, this part is easy to remove and replace. To get the best performance out of your weed eater, you should make this part of your trimmer maintenance. Adjust The Carburetor Sthil carburetor problems can often be avoided by not storing the weed eater when it is filled with gas.

    The reason for this is that as the fuel sits in the tank for longer periods of time, it will begin to slowly evaporate. This leaves a thick residue behind that can block the fuel filter. While it may look as though there is sufficient fuel in the tank when you come to use it, it may not be enough. The problem is that a block carburetor may have to be replaced or at the very least, cleaned before the trimmer will start working properly again. There may be times that you need to completely take the carburetor apart and this can be a laborious and delicate job.

    Removing fuel residue usually requires you to drain the float bowl before taking it out and giving it a good clean with carburetor cleaner. When you do this, you must make sure to get all areas including the port orifices. In the main, this should solve your problems and the trimmer should begin to run correctly once again. The carburetor is an important part of a gas engine that ensures the fuel and oil work effectively together to start the engine.

    However, servicing it can be something of a nightmare and is what may put a lot of people off using gas-powered trimmers.

    That being said, having a better understanding of its maintenance can help. The Idle Speed When you come to take the carburetor apart to service the idle speed, you will only need a screwdriver, which is great news for people who are feeling a little nervous about attempting this task.

    However, we would also advise investing in a carburetor rebuilding kit as well. Begin by testing the current idle speed.

    Because your weed eater engine is shutting off when you start it, it could be that the idle speed is not fast enough. You will see that there is a screw that allows you to adjust the idle speed located, usually, behind the air filter. However, if you are unsure where to find it, then you can take a look at your user manual. It is important not to get carried away when making adjustments and you should turn the screw by one quarter at a time, then start the trimmer and test it again.

    At this point, if the weed eater starts without an issue, you can continue using it. However, if the engine makes a lot of noise when starting up, this could signal deeper problems with the carburetor and it will require taking apart to investigate.

    The Diaphragm The diaphragm is located on one side of the carburetor and is made from plastic. This is a small component that has flaps; these could be the root of your problem. In this case, it could be that the flaps are damaged.

    Most commonly, it will be that they have worn down or are bent. Replacing them is very simple and most user manuals will have details on how to do this The Metering Diaphragm If the diaphragm is not the problem then you may wish to investigate the opposite side of the carburetor where the metering diaphragm is located. There will be a set of screws that can be undone, allowing you to look at the condition of this part.

    The metering diaphragm is another small part that resembles a piece of cotton. It is used to regulate the speed of the engine, however, owing to its thin consistency, it can quickly wear out. At times, it may be worn completely through, whereas at other times, it may only be a little worn.

    In any case, it is a good idea to replace it. Clogged Exhaust Earlier, we talked about airflow which is essential to the smooth operation of your string trimmer. While a lot of problems may be down to a blocked air filter, it may also be that the exhaust is dirty or blocked.

    It is vital that air is able to exit through the exhaust. This part of the trimmer has an arrestor cover which acts as a fire preventer. However, it is not uncommon for this to become clogged with debris. If this happens, the air has nowhere to escape and so the weed wacker will die. You will find the arrester at the back of the muffler. It is a screen which can be easily taken out and cleaned.

    If it is really bad, you may need to replace it entirely but once again, this is relatively inexpensive and easy to do. Seek A Professional If you have been through our troubleshooting checklist and still find that your problems persist, it may be that there is a more significant issue. In this case, you will be left with no other choice but to take your weed eater to the repair shop and seek professional help. The repairs person will be able to take a thorough look over your equipment and diagnose and problems as well as performing a service and any repairs.

    Even for simpler problems, professional help can be invaluable for those who are unsure of how to address the issue. It is far more preferable to admit defeat and have your trimmer professionally serviced than to attempt to fix the problem yourself and potentially cause more damage. Regular Maintenance Gas engines are delicate and they require a lot of upkeep to ensure that they run to the best of their ability at all times.

    It is simply a matter of ensuring that you perform regular maintenance. Keeping your equipment clean is one of the best ways to ensure that it will always work properly. The air filter is one of the parts that may become clogged with dirt but cleaning it is not a challenging task. Simply remove the air filter and use a soft brush or cloth to dust off any dirt and debris.

    Alternatively, you can wash the filter in warm soapy water but be sure to allow it to fully dry before putting it back into the trimmer. Furthermore, you should never use compressed air to clean the filter. Other maintenance that must be completed on a regular basis includes the following; Ensure that the fuel tank does not have any leaks.

    Make sure that the fuel tank is full, using an ethanol-free gas. Clean any removable parts including the fuel filter and arrestor. Furthermore, you should wipe off any dirt and grass from the exterior parts after each use. Clear any debris from the exhaust. Perform seasonal checks on the various engine system parts such as the spark plug and carb, changing when necessary. While this can be frustrating, there is often a simple solution that you can do yourself at home.

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    First, make sure you have enough gas in the tank. I know, I know… it seems ridiculous. So check this. If the tank has plenty of fuel, be sure the primer bulb is filling properly before you start the engine. Sometimes we forget to do this in the midst of working. Blame it on the heat! Know this: Bad gas will sometimes allow a weed eater to start but once you try to rev the throttle, it dies.

    Why is My Weed Eater Overheating? 6 Causes and 4 Solutions

    As a rule, I strongly recommend using ethanol-free gas in your weed eater. Ethanol can really mess up a small engine. Your best bet is to opt for a pre-mixed fuel like Husqvarna XP link to Amazon. Commercial pre-mixed fuel also has the correct levels of fuel stabilizers and assures a precise gas-to-oil ratio for optimal small engine performance. When a weed eater starts okay but dies when throttled, it often indicates that there is restricted fuel flow.

    If your air filter is clogged, it will literally suffocate the engine when you rev the throttle. Clean it or replace it depending on the type of filter it is.

    They are pretty cheap. Checking the Carburetor A carburetor is a component in gasoline engines. It ensures air and fuel work together to start a combustion engine. However, since your weed eater is starting and only dies when giving it gas, that does help us to slim down the potential issues a little. Now, the obvious issue that you need to check before we get technical is whether or not your carburetor is clogged. However, there are plenty of carburetor cleaning options on the market.

    If you want to see this visually, Home Garage has an excellent walk-through video on YouTube that takes you through a lot of what we are going to cover: 1. There will be a set of screws that can be undone, allowing you to look at the condition of this part. The metering diaphragm is another small part that resembles a piece of cotton.

    It is used to regulate the speed of the engine, however, owing to its thin consistency, it can quickly wear out. At times, it may be worn completely through, whereas at other times, it may only be a little worn. In any case, it is a good idea to replace it. Clogged Exhaust Earlier, we talked about airflow which is essential to the smooth operation of your string trimmer.

    Weed Eater Dies When Giving Gas? Quick Steps To Troubleshoot

    While a lot of problems may be down to a blocked air filter, it may also be that the exhaust is dirty or blocked. It is vital that air is able to exit through the exhaust. This part of the trimmer has an arrestor cover which acts as a fire preventer. However, it is not uncommon for this to become clogged with debris. If this happens, the air has nowhere to escape and so the weed wacker will die.

    You will find the arrester at the back of the muffler. It is a screen which can be easily taken out and cleaned. If it is really bad, you may need to replace it entirely but once again, this is relatively inexpensive and easy to do. Seek A Professional If you have been through our troubleshooting checklist and still find that your problems persist, it may be that there is a more significant issue. In this case, you will be left with no other choice but to take your weed eater to the repair shop and seek professional help.

    The repairs person will be able to take a thorough look over your equipment and diagnose and problems as well as performing a service and any repairs. Even for simpler problems, professional help can be invaluable for those who are unsure of how to address the issue. It is far more preferable to admit defeat and have your trimmer professionally serviced than to attempt to fix the problem yourself and potentially cause more damage.

    Regular Maintenance Gas engines are delicate and they require a lot of upkeep to ensure that they run to the best of their ability at all times.

    It is simply a matter of ensuring that you perform regular maintenance. Keeping your equipment clean is one of the best ways to ensure that it will always work properly. The air filter is one of the parts that may become clogged with dirt but cleaning it is not a challenging task.

    Simply remove the air filter and use a soft brush or cloth to dust off any dirt and debris. Alternatively, you can wash the filter in warm soapy water but be sure to allow it to fully dry before putting it back into the trimmer. Furthermore, you should never use compressed air to clean the filter. To achieve this, you shake the container with the oil and gas mixture before each use.

    Learn more about fuel mixtures from SF Gate. Clean the air passages. To clean the air passages, remove the air filter pads and wash them in soapy water, rinse in cool water and let them dry. The mufflers and spark plug arrestors are cleaned using a wire brush. Clean air passages ensure that your engine regulates incoming and outgoing air efficiently. Adjust the carburetor if you need to. Then, tighten the screws that are used to control the amount of fuel fed into the engine.

    Some of the steps are similar to dealing with lawn mower problems. Read my quick guide to tackle the most common mower issues if you have a few spare minutes. The weed eater may stop functioning if it gets too hot. Gardeners Yards explains that this is one of the most common issues.

    It will lead to the spark plugs not firing correctly because of the dirt clogging the tips. Alternatively, it will damage the spark arrester.

    What Causes A Weed Eater To Smoke: (5 Reasons)

    The muffler will get damaged, and the string in the weed eater will burnout. The cutting head at the end of the shaft might melt along with the cords rendering it useless. The string trimmer will keep stalling every time it overheats. It will inconvenience you, and you will have to keep pulling the cords to fire it up.


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