Kanuri food

Kanuri food


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  • Boko Haram and the Kanuri Factor – By Michael Baca
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  • Kanuri’s Food Economy
  • Job Vacancies at Intercommunity Development Social Organization (IDS)
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    Vulnerable people continue to suffer from acute humanitarian needs, displacement, and violence which has been further exacerbated by the COVID pandemic.

    In this emergency context, IDP households are among the worst affected populations as displacement has resulted in the loss and destruction of key assets, the interruption of livelihoods and extensive trauma. Where possible, CRS will seek to maximize project impact, efficiency and effectiveness by adopting market-based approaches — through e-vouchers and the RedRose OneSytem platform — privileging integrated programming and empowering targeted communities through participatory approaches.

    Your thorough and service-oriented approach will ensure that the project consistently applies best practices and constantly works towards improving the impact of its benefits to those we serve. Roles and Key Responsibilities Support the coordination and implementation of all assigned community engagement activities as outlined in the detailed implementation plan in line with CRS program quality principles and standards, donor requirements, and good practices.

    Assist partners in their efforts to reflect on project experiences related to community engagement. Coordinate communication and facilitate information sharing among the project team, implementing partners, and project beneficiaries at the community level to assist local partners in strengthening the community interest, involvement and support networks.

    Liaise with various community stakeholders and mobilize them to ensure full involvement of community leaders, community representatives, and local government representatives in the overall implementation and improvement of project activities. Support the CRS and partner field teams to identify community entry points, potential conflict triggers related to program activities and devise mitigating measures where needed.

    Build capacity among CRS and partner staff in the area of community engagement and effective communication techniques for trust and relationship building. In coordination with the project team support capacity building events for community representatives. Coordinate, monitor, and report on volunteer activities. Compile data provided at the community level as per project requirements and contribute to the preparation of reports.

    Develop and maintained a community stakeholder directory to include but not limited to key contacts in the community, local community based organization groups, local government agencies and humanitarian workers. Basic Qualifications High School Diploma required. Experience required working with international NGOs in the area of emergency response. Demonstrated high level interpersonal and communication skills. Experience in participatory action planning and community engagement. Ability to work effectively under pressure and to organize and prioritize a variety of initiatives.

    Additional education may substitute for some experience. Preferred Qualifications: Experience in participatory action planning and community engagement.

    Experience monitoring projects and collecting relevant data preferred. Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: Observation, active listening and analysis skills with ability to make sound judgment. Good relationship management skills and the ability to work closely with local partners and community members. General knowledge of local and state government practices. Well-developed knowledge of local community cultures, leaders, customs and practices through prior involvement in the community.

    Additional experience may substitute for some education. Attention to details, accuracy and timeliness in executing assigned responsibilities. Proactive, results-oriented and service-oriented. Agency-wide Competencies for all CRS Staff These are rooted in the mission, values, and guiding principles of CRS and used by each staff member to fulfill his or her responsibilities and achieve the desired results: Integrity.

    Boko Haram and the Kanuri Factor – By Michael Baca

    This Islamic empire came into existence in the ninth century, when the Kanuri succeeded in imposing their authority on the politically disunited and scattered communities of the Lake Chad basin. The first empire at Kanem began to collapse from to due to struggles for power and internal dissension.

    The political organization of the empire both the old and new operated at two levels, central and provincial. At the head of the empire was the Mai, a hereditary sovereign chosen from the descendants of Saif. He was the personification of the empire and the wellbeing of his subjects was identified with his state of health. Originally divine rulers, the Mais were sacrosant and preserved all the outward attributes of sacred monarchy long after their conversion to Islam.

    They ate in seclusion, appeared ceremonially before the public gaze on very rare occasions and gave audiences to strangers from behind a screen of curtaining. One notices again and again the wide gap between royal absolutism in theory and despotism in practice.

    Olaniyan was more emphatic: The Mai, like other sacred monarchs in other Nigerian states, was not an autocrat. He had to take cognizance of the existence of two bodies of title holders.

    The first was the council of state, made up of twelve men selected from the nobility and great men of servile origin. These twelve dignitaries, together with the Mai, formed the supreme ruling body.

    It was very unlikely for a Mai to take any decision without consulting them p. Besides a few councilors who held hereditary titles, the Mai appointed court and state officials and assigned responsibilities to them. All important activities of the state took place in his palace.

    But the official organ of government was the Council of Twelve, which advised the Mai on policy and saw to its implementation in his name. This council was composed of the great officials of state who were selected both from the royal family and influential men of servile origin. Without their cooperation, the Mai was practically powerless; they, on the other hand, could govern the country with little reference to his wishes Stride and Ifeka, ; p.

    These three women performed important activities in the palace and they trained the princes. They exercised great influence in the politics of the empire and they also exercised wide-ranging powers during an interregnum or when there was a weak Mai on the throne. By the threat to withdraw their services, this council of women could force a Mai to change his policies.

    The Magira had complete responsibility for the provision of royal food and the Magara for care of the royal children. The Galadima was in charge of the west; the Kaigama the south; the Yerima the north; and Mestrema the east. The governors defended their provinces from attack, prevented them from secession, mobilized their citizens for war and collected tributes for the Mai. They were also responsible for the preservation of law and order and for extending Kanuri influence beyond their frontiers.

    The governors, except for the Galadima, did not live in the provinces and had to appoint representatives known as the Chima to perform their functions. The Kanuri empire and the Sefawa dynasty owed their success and longevity to a number of factors.

    Second, membership of the Council of Twelve was not hereditary and the four great officers in charge of the major sub-divisions of the empire were appointed to govern areas where their families had no vested interests. What is more, with the exception of the Galadima, they and other important noblemen were required to live in the capital under the eye of royal authority.

    Only in times of emergency did they visit the areas they governed and assume personal control. While this lessened the danger of their building up independent local power, it had the further value that as new areas were added to the empire, their natural rulers could be appointed Chima Gana to their own people. This reinforced their authority over their people, guaranteed a high degree of local autonomy and at the same time brought them under the supervision of one of the great Kanuri noblemen at Ngazargamu Stride and Ifeka, The military therefore did not act as a drain on imperial budget.

    The bulk of the troops were local levies that could be called up and commanded by local officials. Yet, this imperial military machine was able to overcome smallscale uncoordinated resistance from the neighbors and repel invasions. The inhabitants managed their own local affairs under their hereditary rulers. Fifth, Islam provided a unifying force. A number of factors accounted for this. First, great precautions were taken to avoid dynastic struggles, preserve the balance of the constitution and minimize rivalries withing the ruling classes of the empire.

    Second, the Sefawa deliberately intermarried with the women in the conquered areas in order to minimize feuds and rebellions. The number of offspring of such mixed marriages became members of the ruling dynasty Olaniyan, ; p. Third, the Sefawa dynasty introduced Islam gradually and peacefully.

    The progenitors of the Songhai empire were peoples living in small communities on both sides of the Niger river in the Dendi area. They included the Da sedentary farmers , the Gow hunters and the Sorko fishermen and canoe-men. They were invaded from the northeast and conquered by bands of dark-skinned Zaghawa nomads. Over time, they were forged into a powerful empire which reached the peak of its power in the 16th century under the Sunni dynasty.

    He was followed by Sunni Ali , who within a period of 28 years transformed the little kingdom of Gao into the huge Songhai empire, stretching from the Niger in the east to Jenne in the west. After the Sunni dynasty came the Askia, the first of which was Askia Muhammad, which reigned between and He divided his empire into provinces, like the Kanuri empire, and each ruled by a governor called koi or fari. These provinces comprised of a metropolitan Gao and 4 major provinces: Dendi to the south of Gungia; Bal, north of the Niger bend and including Taghaza; Benga in the lacustrine area; and Kurmina in the important grain-producing area south of the Niger from Timbuktu.

    The ruler of the eastern province was the dendi-fari while that of the western province was gurman-fari or kurmina-fari.

    Each was advised by a council of ministers. Thus the kurmina-fari was advised by a council consisting of the balama, the commander of the Songhai forces in the west, the binga-farma and the bana-farma, all of whom were royal princes.

    At the center, Askia Muhammad established a council of ministers to assist him in all aspects of government. There were enormous powers in the hands of these governors. But their offices were not hereditary.

    They served at the pleasure of the Askia who could both appoint and remove them at will. One important feature of the reign of Sunni Ali needs to be noted: All the rulers of the second dynasty, the Sunni dynasty, were attached to their traditional religion more than to Islam, and paid far more attention to their idols, priests and diviners than to the Koran and the mallams.

    Throughout his reign, the traditional Songhai religion remained the basis of his authority, and it was only because Islam was gaining ground in the western part of his kingdom that Sunni Ali had to keep up an outward Muslim appearance by saying prayers, fasting and so on.

    Thus, during the period of the Sunni rulers, Islam never became the religion of the state Boahen, This flexibility and tolerance of traditional religious practices were also evident during the reign of the Askia dynasty. Each great official was allowed to have his own distinctive dress, his own personal allocation of drums for use on ceremonial occasions and some distinguishing privilege. Such privileges included the right of the commander-in-chief Dyina Koy to sit on a carpet and sprinkle himself with flour instead of dust when prostrating before the Askia; the exemption of the governor of Gurma from removing his turban when kneeling before his ruler; and the distinction of the Governor of Benga who was allowed to enter the city of Gao with all this drums beating Stride and Ifeka, Thus, it appears that the Askias were either essentially Muslims who for political reasons paid lip-service to the traditional religious forms to retain the loyalty of non-Muslim subjects, or they gradually became re-absorbed into the ethnic religion while maintaining a Muslim gloss that propitiated indigenous and foreign Muslims alike.

    Whichever was the true state of affairs, it is clear that successful Askias drew political support and religious approval from all quarters. This was a remarkable feat of statesmanship Stride and Ifeka, Recent events prompted one irate Nigerian, Mr. Indigenous African Institutions. Boahen, A. Topics in West African History. New York: Longman. Olaniyan, Richard ed.

    Nigerian History and Culture. London: Longman Group Limited. Stride G. Peoples and Empires of West Africa. Lagos: Thomas Nelson. Share this:.

    Reservation

    These twelve dignitaries, together with the Mai, formed the supreme ruling body. It was very unlikely for a Mai to take any decision without consulting them p. Besides a few councilors who held hereditary titles, the Mai appointed court and state officials and assigned responsibilities to them.

    All important activities of the state took place in his palace. But the official organ of government was the Council of Twelve, which advised the Mai on policy and saw to its implementation in his name.

    This council was composed of the great officials of state who were selected both from the royal family and influential men of servile origin.

    Without their cooperation, the Mai was practically powerless; they, on the other hand, could govern the country with little reference to his wishes Stride and Ifeka, ; p.

    These three women performed important activities in the palace and they trained the princes. They exercised great influence in the politics of the empire and they also exercised wide-ranging powers during an interregnum or when there was a weak Mai on the throne.

    By the threat to withdraw their services, this council of women could force a Mai to change his policies. The Magira had complete responsibility for the provision of royal food and the Magara for care of the royal children. The Galadima was in charge of the west; the Kaigama the south; the Yerima the north; and Mestrema the east. The governors defended their provinces from attack, prevented them from secession, mobilized their citizens for war and collected tributes for the Mai.

    They were also responsible for the preservation of law and order and for extending Kanuri influence beyond their frontiers.

    The governors, except for the Galadima, did not live in the provinces and had to appoint representatives known as the Chima to perform their functions. The Kanuri empire and the Sefawa dynasty owed their success and longevity to a number of factors.

    Second, membership of the Council of Twelve was not hereditary and the four great officers in charge of the major sub-divisions of the empire were appointed to govern areas where their families had no vested interests. What is more, with the exception of the Galadima, they and other important noblemen were required to live in the capital under the eye of royal authority.

    Only in times of emergency did they visit the areas they governed and assume personal control.

    Kanuri’s Food Economy

    While this lessened the danger of their building up independent local power, it had the further value that as new areas were added to the empire, their natural rulers could be appointed Chima Gana to their own people. This reinforced their authority over their people, guaranteed a high degree of local autonomy and at the same time brought them under the supervision of one of the great Kanuri noblemen at Ngazargamu Stride and Ifeka, The military therefore did not act as a drain on imperial budget.

    The bulk of the troops were local levies that could be called up and commanded by local officials. Yet, this imperial military machine was able to overcome smallscale uncoordinated resistance from the neighbors and repel invasions.

    The inhabitants managed their own local affairs under their hereditary rulers. Fifth, Islam provided a unifying force. Experience in participatory action planning and community engagement. Ability to work effectively under pressure and to organize and prioritize a variety of initiatives.

    Additional education may substitute for some experience.

    Job Vacancies at Intercommunity Development Social Organization (IDS)

    Preferred Qualifications: Experience in participatory action planning and community engagement. Experience monitoring projects and collecting relevant data preferred. Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: Observation, active listening and analysis skills with ability to make sound judgment. Good relationship management skills and the ability to work closely with local partners and community members. General knowledge of local and state government practices. Well-developed knowledge of local community cultures, leaders, customs and practices through prior involvement in the community.

    Additional experience may substitute for some education. In collaboration with the Program Manager, ensure program staff are fully trained on existing referral systems and relevant SOPs for protection cases. Complete and keep records of the necessary reports. Tasks and Main Responsibilities Supervises the SCOPE registration team and provides appropriate guidance and oversight as they conduct daily field activities. Manages shared e-registration related complaint in accordance with WFP guidelines.

    Actively participates along-with other project officers in coordination meetings, if requested. Develops and maintains strong working relationships with all stakeholders — IDS, Community support groups, community leaders, NGOs, to enhance multi-agency and multi-sectoral cooperation and coordination. Understands work from a process point of view and uses measurement and accountability systems effectively.

    The position will be based in Nganzai. Tasks and Responsibilities Work with IDS security Officer to develop, consolidate, implement, and regularly review operating procedures and security plans. Ensure the availability of all the instruments needed to guarantee the security at the area of interventions in Nganzai town and its environs. Monitor the security situation in the field, reports to the security manager and to report risks and propose mitigation actions promptly.

    Daily track and record all IDS field movement within Nganzai town and its environs. Regularly conduct field visits to assess field site compliance with safety and security procedure during field activities. Respond to security relevant incidents with information gathering and inform the IDS security Officer.

    Undertake continual assessments of equipment including vehicles and organizational assets to ensure that minimal conditions for security are met. Prevent loss and damage by reporting irregularities, informing violators of policy and procedures. Regularly inventory and stock as necessary hibernation kits, first aid kits, and vehicle safety kits, communication gadgets; ensure that staff know what is in the kits and how and when to use them.

    Drop files to upload

    Take appropriate measures to secure IDS premises, personnel, assets, and properties by regularly monitoring and control of IDS existing security set-up. Liaise with other humanitarian actors in the field in order to obtain information on the safety and security situation. Knowledge of local language is highly desired Kanuri, Hausa and Fulani. Flexible and, able to cope with stressful situations. Relevant experience from any other institution will also be considered.

    Previous services with any of the Nigerian Disciplined forces, Certificate of discharge or recommendation from immediate supervisor will be required as proof.

    Proven experience or ability of working effectively in complex security environments and situations with an articulate understanding of the conflict in northeast.


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