Diy autohelm

Diy autohelm


  • Open heart surgery: operating on a broken Raymarine ST2000+
  • DIY remote control for Seatalk autopilot
  • How to modernise your boat on a budget
  • DIY electronic repairs on trusty Autohelm ST4000 and Garmin GPS 152
  • Raymarine Autohelm Rudder Stainless Reference Ball Pin D250
  • Wireless autopilot controls: Madman for Raymarine, Si-Tex SRS-100 for any brand
  • Open heart surgery: operating on a broken Raymarine ST2000+

    Furthermore, we already have a wheel-mounted autopilot. Why on earth do we need a different one? The wheel pilot is rated for vessels up to 16, lbs, and ours is 17, lbs when empty.

    The new autopilot system — Raymarine EV Probably the biggest thing motivating a below-decks autopilot is the memory of our Hecate Strait crossing last June in a gale. Hecate wave state before it got hard. It took us 4 years to figure this out.

    There are three main reasons I see people using self-steering for: Crossing oceans ie, very long passages Convenience — steering for you even when you are perfectly capable of doing so yourself.

    Or sailing in easy conditions. Steering when you physically are unable to, due to being exhausted or occupied with other concerns reefing, seasickness, etc. Our wheel pilot works well for 2 — a convenience device for motoring or sailing in easy conditions. A windvane has additional appealing attributes like being mechanical easier to repair than an electric motor and potentially acting as a backup rudder. We need it for high latitudes coastal sailing on passages of about 3 to 24 hours, for brief periods when reefing, and for convenience when motoring.

    Test fitting the drive unit to the tiller arm in our rudder space. The drive arms come in power ratings from Type 1 to Type 4. The displacement of your boat determines which you need. As to mechanical vs hydraulic for the drive arm, that comes down to personal choice.

    Some reports I read from other sailors recommended hydraulic because the units are stronger and potentially longer lasting. Also, some said that the mechanical drives are quieter than hydraulic — a big plus for us because the annoying constant sound of our old wheel pilot was one thing that turned us off from using it. Our rudder stock area is a very tight, confined space, so I knew this would be a difficult project.

    Raymarine Type 1 Autopilot System Raymarine has a rather sophisticated autopilot system, and it made sense to go with them because we already have other Raymarine electronics — so the autopilot could easily interface with our wind anemometer for driving a course to a true or apparent wind angle. The ACU with the bottom panel open while I was wiring it up.

    This entry was posted in projects on by Patrick. Post navigation.

    DIY remote control for Seatalk autopilot

    Dick Everitt assesses the differences between raster and vector charts when deciding on which chart plotter to buy How I fixed my own Autohelm ST The Autohelm ST had worked well for many years then one day failed without any obvious cause.

    Symptoms: Complete failure. I was looking at finding and fitting a replacement. Investigation: The unit is held to the bulkhead by two thumb-wheel nuts and was easily removed.

    I noted the positions of the wire connections and then unscrewed the four small self-tapping screws and separated the two plastic body shells carefully. The front shell comes away, leaving the printed circuit board PCB plugged into a ring of contacts on the rear shell. It can be carefully pulled away, giving access to both sides of the board. I always look for burn marks and damage that might indicate where a component has failed, but could find nothing wrong until I held the circuit up to the light when the gap in the lower tracks became obvious, one on each side of the board.

    I found the broken track by holding the circuit board up against the light. The tracks show up strongly against the translucent board and the gap is obvious. Was it caused by a leak? The broken track is evident in this photo, nearest the edge of the board. Because the track itself is so small I chose the leg of the integrated circuit to solder the wire to. The wire simply parallels the broken track bridging over the break. Because everything is on such a small scale the thin wire looks cumbersome here.

    To prevent any contact with any other circuit component I sprayed the wire with printed circuit board lacquer. DIY electronic repairs: Easily fixed by tracing the damaged tracks and soldering a fine insulated wire from the start of the damaged track to the end. I chose the comparatively large pads of components to solder to rather than the tiny copper track and used the minimum heat that would do the job excess heat tends to cause the tracks to delaminate from the underlying board.

    The broken tracks occurred on both sides of the board so the front side also had to have a bridging wire added. Reassembly was a reversal of disassembly, with the silicone gasket suitably smeared in petroleum jelly. Costs and savings: The repair cost a few pence and half an hour. Investigation: This seemed like a fault with the antenna since everything else worked fine. I unscrewed four large and eight small screws, carefully pulled the front and back shells apart and unplugged the power cable, which runs from the external connector to a connector on the circuit board.

    The coaxial antenna cable runs directly from the BNC socket on the back panel to the board, so I had to unscrew the socket with a small spanner, taking care not to stress the cable itself.

    Then I had the circuit board unencumbered by the body shells. After a few minutes of careful probing I found the antenna wire had a broken solder connection, most likely as a result of vibration. The outer screen of the antenna cable had broken away from the circuit board pad. This caused the intermittent loss of satellite reception I was experiencing.

    DIY electronic repairs: I simply soldered it back again. Soldering to the large copper pad took a lot of heat and I was worried that the plastic insulation of the wire would melt before the solder flowed. But as I was otherwise faced with throwing the thing away I took the plunge, used a hot iron and worked very quickly.

    The new shiny solder joint between the outer screen of the RG58 cable and the circuit board pad. Why not subscribe today? This feature appeared in the Feb13 edition of Practical Boat Owner.

    How to modernise your boat on a budget

    Each sentence is designated by five letters — for example GPGLL means the following numbers refer to your latitude and longitude — followed by a string of numbers. Nor was the one-way street of talkers and listeners in line with modern networking requirements.

    What was needed was a protocol that allowed large quantities of data to flow back and forth.

    DIY electronic repairs on trusty Autohelm ST4000 and Garmin GPS 152

    A simple NMEA network backbone with power supply and three instrument dropdowns. A cable could also extend the length of the backbone The answer was NMEAwhich is based on the principles of a CAN bus — allowing devices to speak to each other without the need of a central computer to manage it. N2K, as it is often abbreviated, runs at kb, which is 50 times faster than its predecessor. An N2K network consists of a backbone cable running from one end to the other, into which instruments are plugged by means of a T-junction.

    Plugs, wires and sockets are usually pre-moulded to eliminate the potential for poor connections. Modernise your boat: Scenario 1 — New Plotter Multifunction displays have developed as rapidly as mobile phones, and many no longer offer a legacy NMEA input.

    A modern chartplotter can be added to an older network with the right adaptors. Most marine electronics brands offer their own NMEA gateway.

    Raymarine Autohelm Rudder Stainless Reference Ball Pin D250

    But when you have several, the task can be harder. It means you can take an N output from just one of the instruments and get data from all of the instruments. If you replace an old plotter, the new one may speak a different data language.

    However, some warn against the multiplexer solution. This way the NMEA network structure is more defined and devices can choose which data source to use, rather than be forced to use everything from the multiplexer.

    Modernise you boat: Scenario 2 — New transducers and sensors Not so long ago, most transducers and sensors used analogue signals to send their data to a dedicated display. The same is true for other sensors and transducers.

    You then run the wire from the transducer into a black box which puts out the depth data in N2K format. Because of the volume of data, they use a faster version of NMEA that runs at 38, baud, not 4, Make sure that any listeners attached to the AIS are either expecting the data at this rate, or put a multiplexer or buffer in-between the two — to ensure the whole network operates at 4, baud.

    From there, the wind data gets flashed around the network or sent to your smart device, according to your set-up. Modernise your boat: Scenario 3 — New Display A common addition to an older electronics network is a new repeater display, perhaps in the cockpit or at the chart table.

    It is far cheaper than a more powerful MFD, but you will very likely face many of the same issues with connectivity. To replace old or worn instrument displays, you may need an adaptor, but can save money by using one unit to display a range of data. Once again, you are effectively creating a mini N2K network on your boat in order to use the display. At its simplest, that means installing a short length of backbone with a T-piece node for the new display, another node bringing power in from the battery and a third node connecting the NMEA converter.

    The benefit of this construction is that the network can easily be expanded in the future with new instruments. Why on earth do we need a different one? The wheel pilot is rated for vessels up to 16, lbs, and ours is 17, lbs when empty.

    The new autopilot system — Raymarine EV Probably 4x4 binary multiplier biggest thing motivating a below-decks autopilot is the memory of our Hecate Strait crossing last June in a gale.

    Wireless autopilot controls: Madman for Raymarine, Si-Tex SRS-100 for any brand

    Hecate wave state before it got hard. It took us 4 years to figure this out. There are three main reasons I see people using self-steering for: Crossing oceans ie, very long passages Convenience — steering for you even when you are perfectly capable of doing so yourself. Or sailing in easy conditions.

    Steering when you physically are unable to, due to being exhausted or occupied with other concerns reefing, seasickness, etc. Our wheel pilot works well for 2 — a convenience device for motoring or sailing in easy conditions. A windvane has additional appealing attributes like being mechanical easier to repair than an electric motor and potentially acting as a backup rudder.

    We need it for high latitudes coastal sailing on passages of about 3 to 24 hours, for brief periods when reefing, and for convenience when motoring.


    thoughts on “Diy autohelm

    1. Between us speaking, in my opinion, it is obvious. I recommend to look for the answer to your question in google.com

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *