Kabuhayan ng mga aeta

Kabuhayan ng mga aeta


  • First Aeta Forest Food Festival
  • Aeta community optimistic of KSK training program
  • Indigenous Education in the Philippines
  • Angeles City inoculates 107 Aetas
  • 312 Aeta families in AC to receive kabuhayan, food assistance
  • First Aeta Forest Food Festival

    Capas Tarlac near Mt. Early the next morning we were headed to Capas, roughly 3 hours away from Manila, via a Victory Liner bus and then on a tricycle bound for Barangay Sta. Though we initially planned to return to Manila the same day, the long tricycle ride through a winding mountain road where houses were few and far between, gave us a clue that we were probably going to be spending the night there. Since it was a forest festival, we both had grand visions of the event taking place in the middle of the forest where the possibilities for dramatic shots would be endless.

    So our first reaction when we eventually reached a covered court with a galvanized iron sheet roof and concrete floors beside a public school on the main road was initial disappointment.

    It was a venue for them to share cultural practices, specialty food from their respective areas, the preparation of traditional food, hunting rituals, sustainable harvesting practices and food preservation techniques.

    Aetas showed ritual dances such as lapinding, patetet, tumigan and talipi which refer to certain rhythms of music to ask blessing from anitos in various situations — getting ready for a hunt, preparing for battle, a dance for curing the sick, or to show the fight for their ancestral lands. Wild bananas called amukaw have lots of tiny black seeds, which are strained before the edible part of the banana is made into a refreshing juice.

    The Agta and Dumagat tribes from Southern Luzon, who traveled more than ten hours to join the event, also brought with them freshwater crabs and mollusks cooked in gata and other Bicol specials such as pinangat a blend of taro leaves, chili, meat and coconut milk and a very spicy but delicious laing vegetables cooked in coconut milk which they generously shared with us during dinner.

    An opening number featured a traditional hunting dance, where women sat surrounding various forest foods and a live chicken, while the men, as the traditional hunters of the tribe, danced around them to the beat of rhythmic music.

    One elder tribesman carried a bow and arrow during the dance. Later someone tied the chicken to a stick and placed it towards the end of the gym floor. From a distance, the elder tribesman shot the arrow directly at the chicken, killing it instantly. An older tribeswoman picked up the dead chicken and continued the dance.

    The tribesmen took aim at steady and moving targets, including a cutout of a boar tied to a string which was pulled between two posts. Jane Austria-Young of KAKAI, the main event organizer, shared how frogs, monitor lizards, snakes and cloud rats are still part of the indigenous diet in remote mountainous villages. Tribesmen use their excellent marksmanship using handmade bows and arrows and improvised traps to catch their food.

    We noticed that the points in the arrows were made of sharpened nails that had been carved with a knife so that it was ridged. Wild boar, which thrives in mountainous areas, was brought in already cooked. During the presentation of food from different regions, they offered us a taste of baboy ramo wild boar cut in cubes and tied together with bamboo string. The meat was pretty good and tasted like lechon. They also served us a tapa version of boar that was a bit tough to chew and very salty.

    For lunch, stewed beans, fried fish and wild boar cooked in a soup nilaga style was served. Wild rootcrops also form a large part of the forest diet, like labit, an elongated root crop said to have aphrodisiac properties and is considered by the katutubo as their version of Viagra.

    Tribesmen explained that another root crop, kalot, which is derived from yam that grows only in mountainous areas, could be fatal if eaten raw and highly poisonous if not cooked properly. In its uncooked form, the light yellow crop resembles some kind of soft, shredded vegetable. Kalot undergoes an intense preparation of soaking, shredding and drying before it is finally cooked inside a hollow bamboo stalk, as we saw later that night.

    Once it was cooked, we were quickly offered a taste of the kalot with makeshift bamboo sticks used as spoons.

    Since we had nothing to lose except our lives, we had to try it. Kalot tasted a bit bland and chewy like rice and I thought it would go really well if eaten with the salty tapa to balance out the flavors.

    That night, the covered courts transformed into a sort of disco-house for the younger generation when they started playing modern music. As they danced the night away, fellow photographers who we had met up with earlier in the day shared several rounds of lambanog inside the barangay guesthouse. A few opted to sleep on the benches of a nearby school where meals were served, while the rest laid out mattresses and mats on the floor of the guesthouse.

    Early the next morning, we headed to the visit the nearby community to get a few more human interest shots. We thought the simple basketball court at the center of the village would have been much more scenic in terms of photos for the festival, but the logistics of bringing all the the people there would have been difficult. In the community, a tribesman demonstrated for us the art of traditional fire-making.

    He placed wood shavings inside half a bamboo stick, rubbed two bamboo sticks together until it formed a spark in the wood shavings, and then blew on the spark until it caught on fire.

    While men start fires with this method, Aeta women normally use a flint-like rock that they strike together to start a fire for cooking or for lighting their tobacco, which seems very popular with the older women. I was particularly happy with the photos I took of one of the little girls during our short visit. Though learning about the forest food was really interesting, it was the people that made this such a rich experience. Share this:.

    Aeta community optimistic of KSK training program

    The Negrito peoples represent the most ancient civilization in the country, dating back more than Based in the Philippines, De Beer provides technical and monitoring assistance to the organizations. He has worked for over 30 years with indigenous forest communities in many parts of Asia, including the Negritos of the Philippines. Together with the SPNKK he aims to improve the situation of the Negrito peoples, as they face ongoing marginalization. An important part of this is guaranteeing the right to mother tongue education.

    So keep on reading and find out more about Indigenous education in the Philippines! This has resulted in the creation of a film by young Agta leaders as part of a series of 5 , assisted by Jon Corbetter of the University of British Colombia.

    See more examples here: Culture in Education in the Philippines. New School Book: Proud to be Agta The lack of multilingual school materials often poses a challenge for providing mother tongue education. In October , as part of the curriculum overhaul, a bilingual workbook for first graders was released about the Agta forest-oriented culture and way of life, their history and ancestral domain.

    It also includes beautiful drawings made by students of SPA school. This book and other tools are now being shared with other Negrito schools in the area.

    Click here to see the full book! This project arose out of the need to disrupt the harmful effects of mainstream education and environmental changes. It aims to provide Negrito children with an alternative by offering culturally-appropriate secondary schooling, rooted in Negrito worldviews and ways of life. Curious to learn more about the Mobile Forest School? Check out this link. It actively involves the youth in these activities.

    Collaboration with the National Museum of the Philippines to open a permanent exhibition on the knowledge, history and culture of the Negrito peoples. Read more about the opening of this historical event here. It has led to various regular and re-occurring follow-up activity programs, accessible to both Negrito and non-Negrito youth.

    It was a venue for them to share cultural practices, specialty food from their respective areas, the preparation of traditional food, hunting rituals, sustainable harvesting practices and food preservation techniques. Aetas showed ritual dances such as lapinding, patetet, tumigan and talipi which refer to certain rhythms of music to ask blessing from anitos in various situations — getting ready for a hunt, preparing for battle, a dance for curing the sick, or to show the fight for their ancestral lands.

    Wild bananas called amukaw have lots of tiny black seeds, which are strained before the edible part of the banana is made into a refreshing juice. The Agta and Dumagat tribes from Southern Luzon, who traveled more than ten hours to join the event, also brought with them freshwater crabs and mollusks cooked in gata and other Bicol specials such as pinangat a blend of taro leaves, chili, meat and coconut milk and a very spicy but delicious laing vegetables cooked in coconut milk which they generously shared with us during dinner.

    An opening number featured a traditional hunting dance, where women sat surrounding various forest foods and a live chicken, while the men, as the traditional hunters of the tribe, danced around them to the beat of rhythmic music.

    One elder tribesman carried a bow and arrow during the dance. Later someone tied the chicken to a stick and placed it towards the end of the gym floor. From a distance, the elder tribesman shot the arrow directly at the chicken, killing it instantly.

    An older tribeswoman picked up the dead chicken and continued the dance.

    Indigenous Education in the Philippines

    The tribesmen took aim at steady and moving targets, including a cutout of a boar tied to a string which was pulled between two posts. Jane Austria-Young of KAKAI, the main event organizer, shared how frogs, monitor lizards, snakes and cloud rats are still part of the indigenous diet in remote mountainous villages.

    Tribesmen use their excellent marksmanship using handmade bows and arrows and improvised traps to catch their food. We noticed that the points in the arrows were made of sharpened nails that had been carved with a knife so that it was ridged.

    Teves stressed the fact that to ensure development there should be IP participation in all levels of decision making but taking into consideration IP culture and identity and their right to self determination. There should be constructive arrangements to understand Aetas views and values essential to protecting their rights and welfare. We should understand the Aetas vision and their framework of governance for us to live in harmony.

    Angeles City inoculates 107 Aetas

    We must ensure the participation of Aetas, including women and children in decision-making at all levels. To ensure development that takes into account culture and identity and the right to self determination. This project arose out of the need to disrupt the harmful effects of mainstream education and environmental changes. It aims to provide Negrito children with an alternative by offering culturally-appropriate secondary schooling, rooted in Negrito worldviews and ways of life.

    Curious to learn more about the Mobile Forest School? Check out this link.

    312 Aeta families in AC to receive kabuhayan, food assistance

    It actively involves the youth in these activities. Collaboration with the National Museum of the Philippines to open a permanent exhibition on the knowledge, history and culture of the Negrito peoples.

    Read more about the opening of this historical event here.


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