Toronto star local news april 2013 airport gummy bear

Toronto star local news april 2013 airport gummy bear


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  • PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT RECEIVES INDUSTRY ACCOLADES FROM AIRPORTS COUNCIL INTERNATIONAL
  • The Perfectly Precise Hotel™
  • 'Poop' blast 'falling out of the sky' hits Mississauga houses near Pearson airport
  • Complaint Letters

    On leaving the army, a high school dropout, he attended Glendon College, York University as a mature student and gained his doctorate at the University of British Columbia. His particular interest has been in the battlefield behaviour of soldiers. This is Part II of an excerpt from an article which originally appeared in Canadian Military History, Autumn issue and is reprinted with permission of the author. If you missed Part I you can read it here.

    From a peacetime brigade the army expanded in a year or so to five brigades of fifteen battalions. The 1st Rifles went to Hannover in Germany in and the 2nd was meant to relieve them in due course. It formed in Valcartier in the summer of and moved to Ipperwash in western Ontario in the autumn where I joined it. Charles, Jake Burton, a wonderful guide to a young bugger like me and the other platoon commanders, Ian Gilmour and Ted Ball.

    Ted introduced me to the wonders of Stan Kenton who was pretty far out in those days. In the unit, two subalterns, the only two university graduates, were lieutenants, the rest of us second lieutenants. A few were married, the families living nearby, but most of us lived in quarters. There were two cars among us. There were some real characters among the lot. One was fond of sliced onions covered with black pepper and strolling through the hallway of our H-hut quarters firing his 9-mm pistol at the lights.

    We ducked. Vip Vipond had an unfortunate habit of falling to sleep before putting out his cigarette, a habit that later killed him. Robbie Robinson was a fine woodsman, a Second War vet who had not been overseas likely because he was such a superb survival instructor. He showed me how to fry eggs on a shovel, among other useful things. Another Robbie, Mark 2, was a likeable guy and a natural Pioneer Platoon commander.

    Later he was mayor of Petticodiac, New Brunswick. Boom Marsaw later became an evangelical minister, John Saunders was a former sailor, Ron Werry an imaginative instructor, and Bill Crew held the record of most sneezes after taking the obligatory snuff at mess dinners.

    Paul Zmean, Charlie Belzile , and I hung around a lot together. They were all solid companions. The Mess was the centre of our social lives and mess bills were the first and biggest claim on our limited finances.

    Bill Matthews insisted on having a formal dinner every Friday, no matter where we happened to be at the time, and this ensured there was little money left.

    We received an issue of work clothing and kit and got a small initial clothing allowance which gave us a start for dress uniforms. For the rest we arranged credit with a tailor and that was the next priority charge on our five daily dollars. Ipperwash was chaotic as the battalion was just getting organized, and our company was made up of recruits, so we were doing basic training. The training schedule went through Saturday mornings and on Sundays there was almost always a church parade in the nearby towns where the battalion was led by the bugles and Deucehorn , our Great Dane regimental mascot who invariably chose to throw up or exercise his bowels enroute.

    Far distant Army Headquarters decreed that the low level of education standards had to be raised so on two nights a week this high school drop-out taught arithmetic and English barely half a page ahead of my less than enthusiastic soldier students. Tuesdays and Thursdays were doubling days when all ranks had to double everywhere when outdoors and we did a lot of PT rifle exercises using our Lee Enfield.

    They were very effective, both for arm strength and for getting to know our rifles. Routine was from six in the morning six days a week, with two evenings educational instruction, at least one other on officer training, and every Friday was a Mess Dinner. Pay nights were lively. The wet canteen was always a scene of, to understate, boisterous activity. It was an educational experience for an eighteen year old like me to be duty officer and responsible for ensuring that damage was limited.

    One had to tread carefully through beer laden minefields. Another delicate time on duty was one morning when the civilian cooks who were on contract for food preparation slept in after a hard night. When the troops arrived for breakfast nothing was ready and they were understandably displeased. The duty sergeant that morning, fortunately, was Al Stevenson, a former lineman with the Montreal Alouettes, who hustled the cooks out of bed expeditiously. I boiled eggs and Al and I helped serve breakfast when it eventually appeared.

    The battalion was initially slated to relieve the 1st Rifle Battalion in Hannover but this was changed and now we were to replace my old unit, 3RCR, in Korea. In those days troop trains could be lively. Troops always managed to stow drink in their kit and sometimes booze got out of hand. Tighter and tighter restrictions followed to keep the trains from being wrecked but soldiers quickly found ways to get around them.

    We junior officers had to inspect everyone beforehand, including ensuring that water bottles contained only water. Initiative and ingenuity invariably won out. A tied condom filled with rum topped with a bit of water foxed the most conscientious taster. Three COTC cadets joined the battalion that summer for their summer training. All did moderately well in life. Charlie Belzile became commander of the Army; Lonnie Holland is a very successful investment manager.

    Training continued when we returned to Ipperwash and towards the end of the year I was told I would be part of the unit advance party for Korea, first to Vancouver for final medical checks then to Tokyo via the the Aleutians and next day to Seoul in a USAF Globemaster, more commonly, Crashmaster, where the RCR met us.

    Korea was not a pleasant place at that time. Seoul was almost totally destroyed. The road north was not much more than a track with thick dust that made anyone unrecognizable after a kilometre or so. The smell of human feces that Korean farmers used for fertilizer enveloped us. The few small towns and villages on the way, Uijongbu comes to mind, had ramshackle dwellings cobbled together from flattened tins. Hills were formidable, but seemed familiar; whoever chose the area of the Jasper training camp had done well.

    Companies were scattered around in tented camps sited below battle positions in the hills. Colonel Campbell was very gracious in remembering me from my previous time with the unit and said he had tried, unsuccessfully, to have me back.

    One event that stayed with me was checking out the divisional detention barracks near Seoul. The Canadian Provost Corps ran that foreboding place. The solitary cell was carved into a hillside with a barred heavy door; winters were cold, summers hot.

    I later had a New Zealand driver who spent a month in detention and he seriously commented that he would go north to the other side rather than return for another sentence. The RCR had scattered them throughout their rifle companies but when we met the unit on its arrival by ship at Inchon Bill Matthews had decided to concentrate them all in one company in which I was to have a platoon.

    Commanding Koreans was an educational experience. Nick Fritz was my platoon sergeant and we also had a Korean sergeant to pass along our gestured instructions to the troops. The first morning when I spoke to one soldier about his kit the Korean sergeant stepped up and punched him in the face. Nick and I looked at each other wondering what we had got ourselves into; clearly we had much to learn about the culture of the Korean Army.

    Things smoothed out in time and we got along pretty well. The soldiers could conveniently use our linguistic inadequacies to ignore whatever they chose, but they were good in the field and knew the countryside around.

    The actual shooting war in Korea had ended the previous summer with the Armistice that still prevails uneasily more than half a century later. The battalion was part of the 25th Canadian Infantry Brigade which, in turn, was part of the 1st Commonwealth Division. One of the other brigades was British, the other had Australian and British battalions.

    There were also New Zealand gunners, Indian medical units, and others. Our battalion task was to patrol the DMZ. Each rifle company in turn spent a week in the line sending nightly reconnaissance patrols to intercept line crossers and anyone else.

    It was a very effective patrol school, a good way to learn that dangerous trade. Besides patrolling we spent our time training.

    The battalion had not completed unit level training before arriving so we did platoon, company and battalion exercises pretty much continuously. In retrospect we were fortunate that the shooting war was in remission as active operations would have been disastrous, another Hong Kong. The constant turnover of soldiers in the months before leaving Canada never allowed our battalion to complete the company and unit training that would have prepared us adequately for operations.

    This was an exercise triggered without notice by Eighth Army for all formations and units to man their main defensive positions.

    We never knew for sure whether the SCRAM was an exercise or the real thing, but the drill was the same; gather the troops, issue ammunition and head for our designated positions in the hills.

    Fortunately we never did have to fight off a real attack. This was one of a few outside jobs for junior officers. Neil Anderson went on one at around the same time, as an observer with a USAF squadron, and was killed when his airplane crashed a few months later. Under him were two majors, a Canadian intelligence officer and a British operations officer, Peter Willcocks.

    This was likely the last of the old British Commonwealth military organizations and a fine one that worked seamlessly, at least so it seemed to me looking from the bottom up. When I learned that I would be moving, the first thing I did was consult the military staff bible of the time, Staff Duties in the Field. It was a very useful publication with all matter of sound advice and good sense.

    I wanted to find out what an LO was supposed to do and was taken aback to read that an LO should be an older, experienced officer who knew his way around people and affairs. I was barely twenty and looked perhaps sixteen. This may have led to an unspectacular start in my new job.

    I assumed that I should phone the Canadians and did so but missed his instruction to alert the Australians. My mistake was noticed quickly when General Murray got a call from the brigadier who was asking why all the transport had arrived in his area. The transport unit had been informed but not the brigade.

    I thought that I would be packing my kitbag but instead Peter quietly suggested that I pay closer attention to what I was instructed to do. It was a fine lesson.

    Give back for Giving Tuesday

    Excellence Drives Great Experiences Program, which is in place to motivate and reward merchants throughout the year. EDGE points are earned by delivering superb customer service and by participating in airport marketing programs. The merchants with the most points at the end of each quarter are named Merchants of the Quarter. This express restaurant also provides full bar service to travelers looking to relax before or after their flights.

    We applaud our winners for their commitment to providing the best service to our passengers. Schaller was tasked with capturing the spirit of the anniversary on canvas.

    The celebration also included giveaways to surprise and delight passengers, a prize wheel, cupcakes and a live musical performance by Philadelphia-area guitarist Chris Huff. Cheers to 20 more years! Plane Pull Event The Plane Pull experience features teams from around the city competing against each other to determine which team can pull a 76,pound plane the fastest over a predetermined distance of 50 feet. This year, the person MarketPlace PHL team won the competition by pulling the plane in the shortest time, For winning the competition, MarketPlace PHL received a trophy, individual medals for team members and a complimentary happy hour, followed by two hours of drink specials from the City Tap House.

    Every year, airport merchants also support the event through in-kind donations of food and refreshments for the participants. The Plane Pull event was created to raise funds and increase awareness for the services provided by the Ronald McDonald House, which operates two homes in the Philadelphia area. The original Ronald McDonald house was founded in Philadelphia in and is the model for houses around the world. Cantina Laredo offers authentic Mexican food inspired by the cuisine of Mexico City with a modern twist — an unexpected ingredient or a signature sauce.

    Dips, including fresh guacamole prepared tableside to your liking, soups, salads, tapas and full platters are some of the many highlights of the Mexican-style menu. The restaurant also provides full bar service to passengers looking to relax before and after their flights. The company, which began producing essential oils locally, expanded production to include soaps and creams.

    They are inspired by the land and have a desire to bring natural beauty to homes around the world. Passengers can purchase a range of products for face, body and hair, as well as items for the home, travel and gifts. Travelers and airport employees are invited to partake in special culinary offerings all week long from seven merchants in Concourse B.

    Foodie Week occurs yearly and is an opportunity for MarketPlace PHL to show appreciation to its travelers and employees. From March 12 to March 18, the seven restaurants will each have a select entree discounted for everyone to enjoy.

    Excellence Drives Great Experiences. The program motivates and rewards merchants based on delivering superb customer service and participation in airport marketing initiatives by awarding EDGE points. The merchants that earn the most EDGE points at the end of each quarter are awarded the restaurant and retail Merchant of the Quarter trophy. The classic menu offers crab fries, seafood, sandwiches, pizza, wings and more. The restaurant also provides full bar service to travelers looking to relax before and after their flights.

    Located in Concourse F by Gates F9, F11 and F22, Hudson News offers a quick one-stop shopping experience for necessities, reading materials and a variety of packaged snacks and foods to go.

    Hudson News has the skills, experience and know-how to tailor a retail concessions outlet to meet your every need. Timeless Travel carries the finest assortment of luxury watches and is conveniently located in airports across the globe. Longines, Montblanc and Chopard are among the deluxe list of brands sold at the store. Tous is an international lifestyle brand of jewelry and accessories that combines innovative design with traditional craftsmanship, resulting in accessible luxury.

    The Jazz Series will continue every Thursday in February from p. Travelers passing through PHL will enjoy the soulful sounds of live old-school jazz, performed by Arpeggio Jazz Ensemble. Oree has had a longstanding interest in the upright bass and started Arpeggio Jazz Ensemble in the mids.

    Come to the airport early, get through security and shop for your loved ones. MarketPlace PHL has more than retail and restaurant offerings where finding the right gift for friends and family is made easy.

    Travelers can also take advantage of complimentary gift wrapping available now through Sunday, Dec. PHL also offers passengers selections from retailers carrying the best electronics, wines, fashion accessories and more. Passengers looking to sit down and relax before or after their flight can enjoy an expertly prepared meal from chefs like Nicholas Elmi at Baba Bar or a wide assortment of beer, wine, and spirits curated by Jon Myerow and Michael McCaulley at Germantown Biergarten.

    The menu offers deli sandwiches, salads, traditional pub fare and more. The company places great care in selecting only natural elements that provide proven benefits to hair and skin care for all of its products. Travelers looking for last-minute gifts have more options at Philadelphia International Airport MarketPlace PHL announced two new merchant openings ahead of the busy holiday travel season.

    Travelers now have even more shopping opportunities at the Philadelphia International Airport PHL to pick up some of the best gifts available this holiday season. On Friday, Nov. Guests traveling in and out of PHL now have access to a high-end retailer of Italian lifestyle merchandise. Furla provides a contemporary aesthetic for men and women seeking value, beauty and creativity.

    Furla offers expertly crafted Italian shoes, bags and accessories in a wide range of styles and sizes. MAC offers travelers access to a variety of makeup to freshen up any style on the go. The globally-recognized brand — often referred to as a cosmetic candy store — is fully stocked with colorful lipsticks, blush, mascaras, eye shadows and several more beauty essentials.

    By providing easy access for travelers to move throughout the airport without the need to pass through additional security gates, passengers can swing by the stage and enjoy the music.

    Upcoming performances include: Oct. With locations in Pittsburgh International Airport and Washington Dulles International Airport, Bar Symon is quickly becoming a well-known destination for busy travelers seeking a cozy place to relax before and after flights.

    Menu selections include signature dishes like the award-winning Fat Doug burger, a pulled pork sandwich with coffee barbeque sauce and a potato and cheese pierogi. Bar Symon is equipped with power outlets and flight status screens so travelers can recharge and keep track of their next flight. Bar Symon worked with two local organizations to certify and prepare prospective employees to work in the food industry.

    Unite Here Local , the labor union which represents hotel and food service workers, and Philly Concession Enterprises, a company that operates airport restaurants, trained the personnel. In total, 76 Philadelphia residents went through the process and were hired as servers, bartenders and cooks at the restaurant.

    From Oct. Hosted by MarketPlace PHL, Restaurant Week enables passengers to relax and enjoy multi-course, pre-selected menus from sit-down restaurants in each concourse. PHL enables movement between concourses without the need to pass through additional security checkpoints, making it easy for travelers to explore and enjoy more than eateries and shopping options. Participating eateries include:.

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    The menu offers deli sandwiches, salads, traditional pub fare and more.

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    The company places great care in selecting only natural elements that provide proven benefits to hair and skin care for all of its products. Travelers looking for last-minute gifts have more options at Philadelphia International Airport MarketPlace PHL announced two new merchant openings ahead of the busy holiday travel season.

    Travelers now have even more shopping opportunities at the Philadelphia International Airport PHL to pick up some of the best gifts available this holiday season. On Friday, Nov. Guests traveling in and out of PHL now have access to a high-end retailer of Italian lifestyle merchandise. Furla provides a contemporary aesthetic for men and women seeking value, beauty and creativity.

    Furla offers expertly crafted Italian shoes, bags and accessories in a wide range of styles and sizes. MAC offers travelers access to a variety of makeup to freshen up any style on the go. The globally-recognized brand — often referred to as a cosmetic candy store — is fully stocked with colorful lipsticks, blush, mascaras, eye shadows and several more beauty essentials.

    By providing easy access for travelers to move throughout the airport without the need to pass through additional security gates, passengers can swing by the stage and enjoy the music. Upcoming performances include: Oct. With locations in Pittsburgh International Airport and Washington Dulles International Airport, Bar Symon is quickly becoming a well-known destination for busy travelers seeking a cozy place to relax before and after flights.

    Menu selections include signature dishes like the award-winning Fat Doug burger, a pulled pork sandwich with coffee barbeque sauce and a potato and cheese pierogi.

    Bar Symon is equipped with power outlets and flight status screens so travelers can recharge and keep track of their next flight. Bar Symon worked with two local organizations to certify and prepare prospective employees to work in the food industry. Unite Here Localthe labor union which represents hotel and food service workers, and Philly Concession Enterprises, a company that operates airport restaurants, trained the personnel.

    In total, 76 Philadelphia residents went through the process and were hired as servers, bartenders and cooks at the restaurant. From Oct. Hosted by MarketPlace PHL, Restaurant Week enables passengers to relax and enjoy multi-course, pre-selected menus from sit-down restaurants in each concourse.

    PHL enables movement between concourses without the need to pass through additional security checkpoints, making it easy for travelers to explore and enjoy more than eateries and shopping options. Is this the apacolypse? What is occurring in my body right now may only be explained with the final 20 minutes of the movie Independence Day. The sweet gummy bears that I thought I had chewed and swallowed have now resurrected inside my bowels with a vengeance.

    There's no way.

    PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT RECEIVES INDUSTRY ACCOLADES FROM AIRPORTS COUNCIL INTERNATIONAL

    Literally nothing I've eaten in a dozen years could possibly turn my ass into a to-scale model of Mt. Helens, violently spewing what smells like a public bus filled with homeless people with fresh perms, in Mexico City at such a cyclic rate, that I'm worried the war veteran below me thinks he's storming Normandy again.

    Shame on everyone who handled these bears before they made it to me. Shame on Amazon for making theses available for purchase. Shame on the guy in the warehouse who packaged this for shipment.

    Shame on the UPS guy for bringing this to my door. You all knew. I know you knew, and you knew I'd know. And you still let me do this to myself. Shame on you! My last hope now is that the force of gas propelling from my anus may be strong enough to disturb Satan himself in hell.

    I developed a sweet tooth one day and if theres one thing I love, its gummy snacks "Oh look! Sugar free gummy bears I haven't had gummy bears since I was in middle school! And the fact that they were sugar free practically made them healthy, right?

    I downed quite a few of them on the way to the next call and had finished the bag by the early August afternoon In the oppressive southern heat, we blenheim cavoodle dispatched to an unconscious person. As we traversed the city streets I began to get cold chills and cramps despite the triple digit temperatures.

    Boom Marsaw later became an evangelical minister, John Saunders was a former sailor, Ron Werry an imaginative instructor, and Bill Crew held the record of most sneezes after taking the obligatory snuff at mess dinners. Paul Zmean, Charlie Belzileand I hung around a lot together. They were all solid companions. The Mess was the centre of our social lives and mess bills were the first and biggest claim on our limited finances.

    Bill Matthews insisted on having a formal dinner every Friday, no matter where we happened to be at the time, and this ensured there was little money left. We received an issue of work clothing and kit and got a small initial clothing allowance which gave us a start for dress uniforms.

    For the rest we arranged credit with a tailor and that was the next priority charge on our five daily dollars. Ipperwash was chaotic as the battalion was just getting organized, and our company was made up of recruits, so we were doing basic training.

    The training schedule went through Saturday mornings and on Sundays there was almost always a church parade in the nearby towns where the battalion was led by the bugles and Deucehornour Great Dane regimental mascot who invariably chose to throw up or exercise his bowels enroute. Far distant Army Headquarters decreed that the low level of education standards had to be raised so on two nights a week this high school drop-out taught arithmetic and English barely half a page ahead of my less than enthusiastic soldier students.

    Tuesdays and Thursdays were doubling days when all ranks had to double everywhere when outdoors and we did a lot of PT rifle exercises using our Lee Enfield.

    They were very effective, both for arm strength and for getting to know our rifles. Routine was from six in the morning six days a week, with two evenings educational instruction, at least one other on officer training, and every Friday was a Mess Dinner. Pay nights were lively.

    The Perfectly Precise Hotel™

    The wet canteen was always a scene of, to understate, boisterous activity. It was an educational experience for an eighteen year old like me to be duty officer and responsible for ensuring that damage was limited. One had to tread carefully through beer laden minefields.

    Another delicate time on duty was one morning when the civilian cooks who were on contract for food preparation slept in after a hard night. When the troops arrived for breakfast nothing was ready and they were understandably displeased. The duty sergeant that morning, fortunately, was Al Stevenson, a former lineman with the Montreal Alouettes, who hustled the cooks out of bed expeditiously.

    I boiled eggs and Al and I helped serve breakfast when it eventually appeared. The battalion was initially slated to relieve the 1st Rifle Battalion in Hannover but this was changed and now we were to replace my old unit, 3RCR, in Korea.

    'Poop' blast 'falling out of the sky' hits Mississauga houses near Pearson airport

    In those days troop trains could be lively. Troops always managed to stow drink in their kit and sometimes booze got out of hand. Tighter and tighter restrictions followed to keep the trains from being wrecked but soldiers quickly found ways to get around them.

    We junior officers had to inspect everyone beforehand, including ensuring that water bottles contained only water. Initiative and ingenuity invariably won out. A tied condom filled with rum topped with a bit of water foxed the most conscientious taster. Three COTC cadets joined the battalion that summer for their summer training.

    All did moderately well in life. Charlie Belzile became commander of the Army; Lonnie Holland is a very successful investment manager.

    Training continued when we returned to Ipperwash and towards the end of the year I was told I would be part of the unit advance party for Korea, first to Vancouver for final medical checks then to Tokyo via the the Aleutians and next day to Seoul in a USAF Globemaster, more commonly, Crashmaster, where the RCR met us.

    Korea was not a pleasant place at that time. Seoul was almost totally destroyed. The road north was not much more than a track with thick dust that made anyone unrecognizable after a kilometre or so. The smell of human feces that Korean farmers used for fertilizer enveloped us. The few small towns and villages on the way, Uijongbu comes to mind, had ramshackle dwellings cobbled together from flattened tins.

    Hills were formidable, but seemed familiar; whoever chose the area of the Jasper training camp had done well. Companies were scattered around in tented camps sited below battle positions in the hills. Colonel Campbell was very gracious in remembering me from my previous time with the unit and said he had tried, unsuccessfully, to have me back.

    One event that stayed with me was checking out the divisional detention barracks near Seoul. The Canadian Provost Corps ran that foreboding place. The solitary cell was carved into a hillside with a barred heavy door; winters were cold, summers hot.


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