Cura monitor ender 3

Cura monitor ender 3


  • Learn How to Make Your Ender 3 Wireless & Other 3D Printers
  • Configure Ultimaker CURA software for use the Creality 3D printer model ENDER 3
  • The 3D Printer Bee
  • How to Monitoring Your 3D Prints
  • How to connect a 3D printer to Cura
  • Learn How to Make Your Ender 3 Wireless & Other 3D Printers

    Custom Bounding Box: No unchecked Nozzle diameter: 0. Step 2: Printing the Ender 3 OctoPrint parts To be able to mount all the components on your Raspberry Pi, you should first print some parts to achieve a clean and neat setup. Ender 3 Camera mount With the help of the camera mount, you can mount the camera of your Raspberry Pis on the stepper motor of the Z-axis. This way you have a good overview of your extruder and the printing model. So first you print the camera arm and if you are using the first version of the Raspberry Pi camera, the camera holder that comes with it.

    Ender 3 Raspberry Pi housing Through the housing, the Raspberry Pi is mounted on the extruded aluminum rails of Ender 3. You can find the model on Thingiverse. Here there is a version for the Raspberry Pi 3 as well as for the Raspberry Pi 4. For OctoPrint the first version is especially recommended. If you choose the version for Raspberry Pi 4, you should add a fan to the case, as this tends to get very hot.

    Buck converter housing If you want to power your Raspberry Pi directly from your Ender 3, you should also print the included converter housing. Step 3: Mounting the Raspberry Pi camera To connect the two parts of the pi-mount together, you should use an M3 x 20 mm screw and nut. Then connect the Raspberry Pi ribbon cable to the camera, bring it in to position and then slide the camera cover back.

    To mount the camera, you need the pi-camera extension cable, because the supplied cable is not long enough. Especially recommended is a cable with a length of mm. Since it is a very tight fit, you should be patient and be careful not to damage the camera.

    It may be necessary to file some edges down. Instead of the official Raspberry Pi camera, you can of course also use other OctoPrint cameras or webcams, but you will need a different mount. Before you mount all components on your printer, it is recommended to test the connections first. It is easier to correct any errors without having to connect and disconnect the brackets.

    Step 4: Attaching the Raspberry Pi The 3D printed case for the Raspberry Pi consists of two parts: a port front panel and the case itself.

    First, you install the front panel. Then you slide the Raspberry Pi into the housing and connect the camera cable. It makes sense to mount the Raspberry Pi in the opening in the empty cavity directly under the printing bed.

    You will need two M4 x 8 mm screws and two M4 aluminum channel T-nuts. First, attach the screws and nuts to the housing with the nuts facing upwards and then slide the nut end of the screws into the lower extruded aluminum piece. Then tighten both screws from below.

    Lay the camera cable under the bottom of your printer between the printer and the table. The rubber feet of the 3D printer gives you some freedom of movement.

    To do this, tap the cable on the back of your Ender 3 with a Y-splitter and reduce the voltage to 5 volts with a buck converter. If you would like to power your Raspberry Pi in the usual way, this is of course also possible. Now you fix the buck converter housing to the back of your Ender 3 using foam tape. Now center the print bed and place a small object of your choice in the middle. Then use the small white wheel that came with your camera to rotate the camera lens and focus it that way.

    However, you should only make very small rotations and regularly check the current position until the camera is in focus. Additional note: After you have completed all steps, it is recommended to update the firmware of your Ender 3 before actively using OctoPrint. The newer versions of Marlin offer a thermal tear out protection. This helps to prevent fires on 3D printers. Now OctoPrint is fully controlled on your Ender 3 and you can try out and enjoy its many benefits!

    OctoPrint Anywhere You may be wondering if the previously mentioned OctoPrint Anywhere plug-in might be of interest to you as well. As described above, OctoPrint Anywhere is a plug-in that allows you to use the basic functions of OctoPriint anywhere. This means that you can monitor and control your print jobs from anywhere in the world.

    OctoPrint Anywhere also offers many other advantages. First of all, remote monitoring and control, very low data consumption, and the ability to easily control your printing at any time. In addition, secure access is guaranteed because no port forwarding is required. This sounds very exciting at first, but in summary, this plug-in is especially suited for people who do business with 3D printing.

    If you make 3D printed models as a hobby, OctoPrint Anywhere may not be of much importance to you. OctoPrint is the most widely used host for wireless 3D printers.

    This is due in large part to its rich feature set and ease of use. OctoPrint is coupled with the Raspberry Pi, providing a simple solution for remote access to the 3D printer. Files can be sent and cut, and it is also possible to monitor printouts in various ways.

    What are the basic features of OctoPrint? OctoPrint provides remote access to the 3D printer through the wireless monitoring and control option. It is also easy to set up and use. In addition, this open-source software is packed with features that not only take advantage of wireless control but also improve the overall workflow.

    What is the so-called spaghetti detective? The Spaghetti Detective is an extended version of the OctoPrint Anywhere plug-in and allows the user to detect failed prints. The Spaghetti Detective recognizes if the print takes the intended time and immediately notifies the user if this is not the case. In such a situation, the user has the possibility to stop the running print process immediately.

    What are the alternatives to OctoPrint? In addition to OctoPrint, there are other software products that also allow remote control of the 3D printer: MatterControl is particularly suitable for individuals and small projects.

    It is ideal for fast turnaround and can monitor and store 3D prints via cloud sync. MatterControl has the disadvantage of not containing Raspberry Pi, which must be purchased separately.

    An advantage is that the software is completely free. Repetier is another remote control software and is suitable for both small and large projects.

    It allows multiple users to print on multiple printers. However, the setup is relatively complicated and no cloud services are available to the user. The basic software is available for use free of charge, the Pro software is subject to a one-time fee. AstroPrint is designed for beginners as well as for small or large companies. This software is fully cloud-based, allowing printing from anywhere and controlling multiple printers. Also, this software offers less control compared to other solutions.

    For home users, AstroPrint is free of charge, for more printer memory a monthly fee is charged. These are affiliate advertising programs designed to enable websites to earn advertising revenue through advertising and linking to Amazon.

    Configure Ultimaker CURA software for use the Creality 3D printer model ENDER 3

    Connect your printer to your pc correctly with a USB cable. This number is the port that you need to use. Problem connecting to Cura? Bad USB-cable There are some cases when a damaged cable can lead to a bad connection between the two devices. So perhaps you are asking why should I control my 3d printer from a PC?

    There are lots of good reasons to do so. The main benefit of doing so is that you can manually send G codes to your printer, this is fundamental for testing and calibrating different values.

    Benefits connecting your printer to a computer Setting up your E-steps Setting your e-steps needs you to manually input the distance extruded so you can check the difference between the demanded length and the actual length extruder by the printer. I will be speaking about e -steps in another article. Well, we can do this without connecting our computer but it is preferred that you test the script before you launch it. More flexibility It is much easier to just slice right away and click print, than saving the Gcode file on a memory card and start your preparation process.

    I love using my printer from the computer, I prepare everything on the spot with Cura. I preheat the printer while I prepare my printing settings, home all the axis, and auto-level. Once done all these steps I slice my model and click print. You can control remotely your printer with Cura if you want.

    To achieve these you must set up a server and install software on it that can manage your printer. Usually, you use it to upload files and send the print command to your printer. The easiest software to use in this case is Repetier-Server. After that you only need to add your printer to Cura with the network options, setting up the IP manually.

    This is kinda useless on Cura, usually, for this kind of task, I use a Repetier host that integrates Repetier server and makes the process much faster and easier. How to print from USB So how do you avoid those problems I talked about earlier without too much of a headache?

    The easiest way is by using the latest version of Cura. And I will explain to you why. Cura searches all ports and tries all baud rates so eventually, it will find your printer! Install Cura Go to the download page and download the latest stable version, the monitor mode is supported in the versions 3. It will popup the printer settings where you should select your printer. If you have the latest Tarantula Pro then you must select the Tevo Tarantula original, and after that, we will edit the settings.

    After that go to extruder settings and check that you have the right material diameter set. Setting up the connection After we finish with the printer settings we only need to connect it to our computer with the USB cable and start the printer.

    Go the monitor tab on Cura when you see the connected icon. Cura monitor panel Control panel The control panel seems easy and nothing too complicated but there are some first things to do : Home all axes Jog Controls Jog controls Looking in the photos you are going to see the XYZ controls, this is used to move the axis around, in the center of the commands you can find the homing button displayed as a friendly home icon.

    Jog Distance Jog distance Is the distance the axes move when you use the built-in controls, this allows you to make little movements and avoid reaching the maximum distance with one movement, the units are in millimeters by default.

    G-code Input This box lets you input all kinds of G-codes, if you are interested read here all about the g-code dictionary. Printer settings You can set a default temperature and preheat your printer while you prepare the model Printing information This part is not very useful it simply estimates the remaining time, if you want to have a better insight about this, you can go to the preparation tab and click on the information button just above the print button I hope this guide is a good start to help you achieve more control from your printer and that it helped you understand some basic concepts.

    Usually, these persons don't succeed for two main reasons Author.

    The 3D Printer Bee

    Here are a few parts I designed and printed using Fusion First pic is to replace a broken plastic part on a home theater speaker stand, Left is mine, Right is original.

    Second pic is brackets to hold a valance on window blinds, top ones are mine, bottom clear is original. Reddit is a great place for 3D inspiration.

    How to Monitoring Your 3D Prints

    I have done about 40 custom designed and printed parts so far. I even designed and printed parts for a custom claw machine I built with my son. Without leveling the hot end will be too close or too far from the print bed at various positions. Second, it records screenshots every X seconds I use second intervals by default. It drops all of these JPGs into a folder of your choice, then lets you combine the JPGs into a time-lapse video when the job is done.

    If something goes wrong with a print, I can look through the JPG still images and find the ones where the problem occurred to see exactly what happened.

    AmCap software The AmCap software provides a nice, clean view of the QuickCam Prowhich can be set to have no menu bar and stay on top of other windows.

    Here there is a version for the Raspberry Pi 3 as well as for the Raspberry Pi 4. For OctoPrint the first version is especially recommended.

    If you choose the version for Raspberry Pi 4, you should add a fan to the case, as this tends to get very hot.

    Buck converter housing If you want to power your Raspberry Pi directly from your Ender 3, you should also print the included converter housing.

    How to connect a 3D printer to Cura

    Step 3: Mounting the Raspberry Pi camera To connect the two parts of the pi-mount together, you should use an M3 x 20 mm screw and nut. Then connect the Raspberry Pi ribbon cable to the camera, bring it in to position and then slide the camera cover back. To mount the camera, you need the pi-camera extension cable, because the supplied cable is not long enough.

    Especially recommended is a cable with a length of mm. Since it is a very tight fit, you should be patient and be careful not to damage the camera. It may be necessary to file some edges down.

    Instead of the official Raspberry Pi camera, you can of course also use other OctoPrint cameras or webcams, but you will need a different mount. Before you mount all components on your printer, it is recommended to test the connections first. It is easier to correct any errors without having to connect and disconnect the brackets.

    Step 4: Attaching the Raspberry Pi The 3D printed case for the Raspberry Pi consists of two parts: a port front panel and the case itself. First, you install the front panel. Then you slide the Raspberry Pi into the housing and connect the camera cable. It makes sense to mount the Raspberry Pi in the opening in the empty cavity directly under the printing bed.

    You will need two M4 x 8 mm screws and two M4 aluminum channel T-nuts. First, attach the screws and nuts to the housing with the nuts facing upwards and then slide the nut end of the screws into the lower extruded aluminum piece. Then tighten both screws from below. Lay the camera cable under the bottom of your printer between the printer and the table. The rubber feet of the 3D printer gives you some freedom of movement.

    To do this, tap the cable on the back of your Ender 3 with a Y-splitter and reduce the voltage to 5 volts with a buck converter. If you would like to power your Raspberry Pi in the usual way, this is of course also possible.


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