Arduino midi patchbay

Arduino midi patchbay


  • $50 Open-Source MIDI Controller, The Chomp, Looks Awesome
  • Open Music Lab’s Projects and Tools
  • How you can Convert a MIDI Port to USB (3 Steps)
  • $50 Open-Source MIDI Controller, The Chomp, Looks Awesome

    The only advantage of merging is if you want to use the same channel on multiple controllers. Standardize on a set of channel assignments this controller always on channel 1, this one on 2 etc and it is easy to run things. I am new to setting up multiple midi devices and now feel I totally misunderstood the thru and merge scenarios. I was under the impression the merge could still maintain channel assignments but reduced to one midi out Are you saying this can be done using 'thru' I am struggling with multiple controllers on different channels.

    I have sub-patches use a different controller on a different channel than the main patch and not sure I am understanding how to do it right as I've had somewhat 'hit or miss' luck getting the controllers recognized. The typical use would be merging a keyboard with a sequencer, both using the same channel to control one synth.

    With MIDI thru the channels and assignments plugged into the device are copied and passed thru to the output along with the signals produced by the device. In some devices, if set to the same channels of some inputting signal, will merge them in the device. This is rare. That is why most keyboards only have an out. The biggest problem with merging is that the signal can be delayed by all the different devices on the chain.

    The first unit in the chain will be delayed the most. It is funny how as much as we read and try to understand it sometimes takes just a few words with a down to earth example to make things crystal clear. I have controller patch objects, which map CC's to pots and toggles, etc, but Axoloti only allows me to assign one in the main patch Is there a best method for assignment of controller patches are they needed when sub-patches are on a different channel than main patch?

    Standardize on a set of channel assignments this controller always on channel 1, this one on 2 etc and it is easy to run things" It is described that midi merge is setup to allow multiple controllers to one destination, with this in mind, I don't quite understand what gets lost in translation in merge that is gained by midi thru. Ultimately, the design of the code will be to check each port for a message, if there is a message check to see if it is a status byte, if it is then read the next two bytes and send the status byte, and the following two data bytes and send them through to the midi out, then move onto the next port and do the same.

    The main challenge I see is, 1 - what to do if I read the first byte and it is not a status byte, 2 - ensuring as it cycles through the midi inputs, that it does so in an efficient maner to not cause messages to back up and cause delays to the message arriving. I have been reading up on a few home made devices and it does seem as though the 2 issues I described are a common concern, but there does not appear to be too much reference to what has actualy eventuated in testing, hence my desire to raise the post to begin with.

    This article shows how to install, configure and play a simple software synthesizer amsynth on Raspberry Pi 2. The first part in this series is a quick installation and configuration guide for Raspbian Jessie Linux. Please consult these articles for background information. It is polyphonic 16 voices max. Each voice has two oscillators, a 12 or 24dB per octave resonant filter and dual ADSR envelope generators.

    All can be modulated using a low frequency oscillator LFO. The synth also has distortion and reverb effects.

    Read more about amsynth at the amsynth web site. When amsynth launches, it automatically searches for a JACK audio server. Run the following command to install amsynth: sudo apt-get install amsynth The package manager fetches amsynth and the libraries, etc. To repeat my initial experiment, start two terminal windows on the desktop.

    In the first window, run amsynth: amsynth Simple, huh? No command line arguments to mess with. You should see the amsynth front panel as shown in the image below.

    Notice the status at the bottom of the amsynth front panel. Use aconnect, again, to patch the Keystation to amsynth: aconnect ALSA ports are identified by client and client-specific port number. The first port in the command line above is the sender port and the second port is the receiver port.

    Enter aconnect -l to display port and connection status. Hit the keys on the Keystation and amsynth plays the notes. Turn the virtual knobs while holding a note. Twist MIDI controller knobs and watch amsynth track the changes. If you followed these directions and played amsynth with a MIDI keyboard of your own, you probably noticed the latency lag between striking a key and hearing a sound.

    JACK is a server that runs as a separate Linux process. Just in case you see this term when reading supplementary articles on the Web. Launch qjackctl. Change JACK settings, if necessary. Start the JACK server. Launch amsynth or other JACK-aware application.

    Make connections in qjackctl or ALSA. Full disclosure, I first started JACK from the command line using a variety of suggested options and had only limited success. I got a few runtime errors along the way and the latency was unacceptably long. These first experiments produced one useful tip: Add yourself to the Linux audio group. The notion of a group in Linux is similar to the different classes of users that you find on a different operating system, e. Users belonging to the audio group have special rights which improve the performance of realtime applications like a soft synthesizer.

    These rights include the ability to reserve and lock down memory and to run time-critical operations at a higher priority. The Raspbian Jessie image comes equipped with the audio group. The command: sudo groupadd audio adds the audio group. You will need to define the rights and privileges for the audio group — an expert task that I will not explain here. See the references at the bottom of this page for more details. The next step is vital to your sanity.

    Log out. Log all the way out. If you logged in from the text shell and started the X Windows system, then leave X Windows and log out from the text shell.

    Then, log back in. Run groups and the system should now show you as a member of the audio group. Group membership is established and inherited when you log in. Fortunately, JACK has a graphical control panel called qjackctl. The control panel uses the cross-platform Qt graphical user interface GUI package which supplies all of the buttons, drop-down lists and so forth. It tells the Linux shell to run qjackctl and detach the control panel from the terminal window.

    This leave the terminal window live and ready to accept new commands. The qjackctl control panel is shown in the following image. Click the Setup button in order to make a few small changes.

    Change the Sample Rate parameter to Hz, which is the rate prefered by amsynth. If the number of periods is less than 4, you will probably hear noisy, glitchy audio. Please see the settings that I used in the following image. Click images to get full resolution. Now launch amsynth: amsynth The soft synth will search for the JACK audio server and should connect to it. They each have similar capabilities and allow you to make connections between MIDI and audio ports. The main difference is persistence or lack thereof.

    Connections are temporary and are broken when a client is terminated. Connections are forgotten when the JACK server is terminated, too. The Patchbay lets you define, save and load port-to-port connections in a file. JACK needs to be running first, of course. I made connections using both techniques just for fun.

    The image below is a snapshot of the Connections dialog box. There are three tabs — one for each type of connection port. To make a connection, just select a sender in the left column and a receiver in the right column. If you terminate amsynth or JACK, the connection is lost and forgotten. Click the New button. Use the appropriate Add button to add output sockets to the left column or to add input sockets to the right column.

    Then, choose two ports and click the Connect button. After making connections, save the set-up to a file. The interface is intuitive. You can save and load as many different set-ups as you would like as long as there is free drive space! Use ls -a to show all files in a directory including the hidden ones.

    This, by the way, is your home directory. Linux applications typically store configurations in hidden files within your home directory. The one aspect that qjackctl does not handle well is the deletion of Patchbay set-up files. If you delete or move the XML file, then you will get a warning message like: Could not load active patchbay definition.

    At this point, you should be able to play amsynth from an external MIDI controller with acceptable latency. Have fun! Here are the links.

    Launch qjackctl. Change JACK settings, if necessary. Start the JACK server.

    Open Music Lab’s Projects and Tools

    Launch amsynth or other JACK-aware application. Make connections in qjackctl or ALSA. Full disclosure, I first started JACK from the command line using a variety of suggested options and had only limited success. I got a few runtime errors along the way and the latency was unacceptably long. These first experiments produced one useful tip: Add yourself to the Linux audio group. The notion of a group in Linux is similar to the different classes of users that you find on a different operating system, e.

    Users belonging to the audio group have special rights which improve the performance of realtime applications like a soft synthesizer. These rights include the ability to reserve and lock down memory and to run time-critical operations at a higher priority.

    How you can Convert a MIDI Port to USB (3 Steps)

    The Raspbian Jessie image comes equipped with the audio group. The command: sudo groupadd audio adds the audio group. You will need to define the rights and privileges for the audio group — an expert task that I will not explain here. See the references at the bottom of this page for more details. The next step is vital to your sanity. Log out. Log all the way out. If you logged in from the text shell and started the X Windows system, then leave X Windows and log out from the text shell.

    Then, log back in. Run groups and the system should now show you as a member of the audio group. Group membership is established and inherited when you log in. Fortunately, JACK has a graphical control panel called qjackctl. The control panel uses the cross-platform Qt graphical user interface GUI package which supplies all of the buttons, drop-down lists and so forth.

    It tells the Linux shell to run qjackctl and detach the control panel from the terminal window. This leave the terminal window live and ready to accept new commands. The qjackctl control panel is shown in the following image. If you're lost, I advise reading the manual.

    MIDI plays a big part in your workflow. I used to live in a cave - you know - spending hours and hours alone clicking music out of my mind into the computer. There are just a few tracks that contain material I actually played on a keyboard Hammond solo in "Spin" for instance - it's a trick recording I performed that in 4 times slower tempo, so it's a cheat anyway, also I used an AKAI MPK mini. Now I'm leaving the cave and slowly preparing myself for the stages, so reliable live MIDI processing is starting to get important just like the daily piano practice.

    I never know what is what, I just remember the red likes the orange and hates the green. An example of Unfa's connections as seen in Catia. Note the red, orange and green MIDI ports. Tell us a bit about your hardware set up My main sound recording device is Zoom H2. I chose it, as it was a highly portable and economic all-in-one sound capture device that I'm using for field recording, line recording of live events or electric instruments, and as a stereo home-studio microphone.

    I've recorded tens of hours of podcasts, many songs, hundreds of gigabytes of sounds, rehearsals, concerts, events, talks It's years old now. I was thinking about getting Zoom H2n, but I decided that the old one is still fine and I don't need a new recorder. Recently I switched to a Dell Lattitude shipped with Ubuntu Since I work on laptops and can't imagine myself confined to one desk right now. Since I'm always working with headphones, the first serious purchase in the field were Denon AH-D I bought them around I had to resolder the wires inside one headphone, I turned the muffs inside out and added dampeners made from scotch, because the rig was making clapping noises when I was walking quickly wearing the headphones.

    However they sound very good for their price and are quite comfortable. I guess the collaborative project with Combustible Lemonade will be mixed and mastered with them. I chose it for Guest post health big potential for live performance and versatility. What is your history with Linux? I think my first distribution was Ubuntu 8. After that I became a distro vagabond.

    I used to change the distribution every time something broke and I wasn't able to fix it it has to work elsewhere! After a few years of more and more desperate searching for an unbreakable distribution I settled down with KXStudio. I realized that my attitude is wrong and I'm not helping to make things better.

    So instead of reinstalling my system as an ultimate fix, I started reporting bugs and providing feedback to developers. As for KXStudio that I'm using for a year now - I value it's powerful and convenient KDE desktop, fantastic set of cutting-edge tools available through it's own repositories, good support and custom applications that are developed for it. Why do you feel open source is important, and what for you is the most important aspect of Linux audio?

    I believe open source is the future of all computing. It's the Gospel of software, the good news, the freedom and joy of serving each other without demanding a pay. I think very interesting things will emerge as this mentality spreads — Blender seems to be the biggest self-funding open source project that's showing new possibilities for other FLOSS projects.

    What do you feel is currently lacking in Linux audio? A linear phase EQ plugin. It's like plugins in one, packed in a slick box. For effect processors, I extremely value Calf plugin suite. These are top notch and I think the Linux audio community can show them with pride. Ardour 4. It's a fabulous project. Unfa mastering his songs in Ardour Also LMMS is developing nicely, it's made great progress in last year I made some contribution to that and I can't wait to see what comes next.

    What resources have your found most useful on your Linux audio journey? It's hard to point something discrete, because that was and still is a broadband ocean of resources. I really like using Synaptic a popular graphical package manager to search for tools I need to get something done, or just putting in random tags and looking for interesting titles or descriptions.

    I've discovered a lot of great software by having fun with it's quick filter. I am new to setting up multiple midi devices and now feel I totally misunderstood the thru and merge scenarios. I was under the impression the merge could still maintain channel assignments but reduced to one midi out Are you saying this can be done using 'thru' I am struggling with multiple controllers on different channels.

    I have sub-patches use a different controller on a different channel than the main patch and not sure I am understanding how to do it right as I've had somewhat 'hit or miss' luck getting the controllers recognized. The typical use would be merging a keyboard with a sequencer, both using the same channel to control one synth.

    With MIDI thru the channels and assignments plugged into the device are copied and passed thru to the output along with the signals produced by the device.


    thoughts on “Arduino midi patchbay

    1. It is a pity, that I can not participate in discussion now. It is not enough information. But this theme me very much interests.

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